User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  2
Likes Likes:  0
Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 17 to 24 of 49

Thread: Nepenthes Attitudinal Distribution Chart

  1. #17
    Brokken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    1,579
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by amphirion View Post
    i agree with vraev: what would probably be very helpful is finding the mean distribution of each species...yeah, certain species are found at ### to ### ft. but where are the majority hanging out? that would be very useful.
    There is another chart but I can't remember where I saw it which shows altitudinal ranges in the form of a bar graph. I'll see if I can find it.
    "There is no pain as great as being alive,
    no burden heavier than that of conscious life. "
    -Rubén Darío-

  2. #18
    Carnivorous plant enthusiast vraev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,806
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Is it a bar graph with a mean population count? That would be mighty useful to understand the optimal temperatures for the pickier species. I am also perplexed by inclusion of tenuis, pitopangii and klossii in that range. Well...I guess we have a new project for someone who can visit these places.

  3. #19
    Brokken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    1,579
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by vraev View Post
    Is it a bar graph with a mean population count? That would be mighty useful to understand the optimal temperatures for the pickier species. I am also perplexed by inclusion of tenuis, pitopangii and klossii in that range. Well...I guess we have a new project for someone who can visit these places.
    No, it does not specify distribution - though one would imagine that like any statistical bell curve, the majority of those specimens probably lies somewhere in the middle. I know that's a big leap of faith on my part, but all other things being equal (which is probably unlikely), one would expect it to be true.
    "There is no pain as great as being alive,
    no burden heavier than that of conscious life. "
    -Rubén Darío-

  4. #20
    mksmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Washington DC
    Posts
    131
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I did forget aristo and bosh. Let me know if there are others. I updated the chart:
    http://www.michaelkevinsmith.com/nep...ure-Chart.html

    How many think burbidgeae should be moved up to the highland category based on the criteria that would categorize it as such? I am still thinking intermediate, I have witnessed a crop burbidgeae seedlings grown in highland temps and intermediate. Intermediate outperformed highland over the course of several years. Also, it could be that the mean of burdbidgea populations are found in the 1600-1800 range right along side rajah.

    @vraev ... by perplexed do you mean that pitopangi, tenuis, and klossi would not grown in the optimal temps of Day: 75-85° / Night: 55-65° F. I think that temp range would be perfect for these species. No?




    Here is the other chart you guys are looking for:
    http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=120181

  5. #21
    Carnivorous plant enthusiast vraev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,806
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Brokken View Post
    No, it does not specify distribution - though one would imagine that like any statistical bell curve, the majority of those specimens probably lies somewhere in the middle. I know that's a big leap of faith on my part, but all other things being equal (which is probably unlikely), one would expect it to be true.
    Well..Especially in the case of pitcher plants, we can say that it may not be true. For instance, lets look at villosa. A few individual plants that manage to get a foothold at 1500-1600m ASL might be just outliers and the majority is in concentrated above 2500m. Outliers can greatly skew the bell curve hypothesis.

    Quote Originally Posted by mksmith View Post
    I did forget aristo and bosh. Let me know if there are others. I updated the chart:
    http://www.michaelkevinsmith.com/nep...ure-Chart.html

    How many think burbidgeae should be moved up to the highland category based on the criteria that would categorize it as such? I am still thinking intermediate, I have witnessed a crop burbidgeae seedlings grown in highland temps and intermediate. Intermediate outperformed highland over the course of several years. Also, it could be that the mean of burdbidgea populations are found in the 1600-1800 range right along side rajah.

    @vraev ... by perplexed do you mean that pitopangi, tenuis, and klossi would not grown in the optimal temps of Day: 75-85° / Night: 55-65° F. I think that temp range would be perfect for these species. No?
    Well...I think it has to be clearly defined whether the classification refers to "altitude" or "temperature range". By that I mean if you take macrophylla, this species is typically a highland-UHL, but from experience, it is waaay tougher than villosa in growing during the warmer summer months. N. villosa stops growth and starts yellowing, while N. macrophylla is unaffected. So clearly, species can have differences in tolerance to temperature variation. Personally, I think the classification should refer to the altitude. And that definition has to be made based on the median of population consensus.

    With regards to burbidgeae... From what I read, its a well known fact tat highland species seediings greatly benefit from higher temps in early stages of its life. Have you found that adults grow better at intermediate as well? I understand your argument...another bit of evidence to this matter is from Joel's website:
    It seems that this species doesn't tolerate as low of temperatures as other highlanders. I would venture to guess that it does real well in slightly warmer conditions as an intermediate. I've heard from some other growers having success growing N. burbidgeae in areas of Florida as a lowlander but I don't know if that is entirely true.
    source: http://www.nepenthesaroundthehouse.com/nburbid.htm

    For sure, higher temps lead to increased growth, faster metabolism etc. But analogous to VFTs skipping dormancy, how long can a N. burbidgeae hold out in intermediate conditions. If what you say is true with regards to the median of the population lying with N. rajah in the highland range, that might provide the answer that: N. burbidgeae is tolerant for prolonged periods at intermediate "conditions", but requires highland "conditions" to persist long-term.
    Last edited by vraev; 06-30-2011 at 12:28 AM.

  6. #22
    swords's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Cernunnos Woods
    Posts
    8,120
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For my situation the specifics of "intermediate - ultra highland" don't actually matter all that much on a practical level - do I heard gasping? Plants in those categories (over 1000m) are all grown in the HL chamber 70-75*F days and 50*F nights. Plants in the first two columns are grown in the LL 80-90*F days and 70-80*F nights.

  7. #23
    ellisonk001's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Mililani Hawaii
    Posts
    1,103
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This will prove to be a very helpful reference. Thanks for taking the time to put it together and share it!!!

  8. #24
    An orchid fancier with a CP problem chibae's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    mid-Atlantic coast, USA
    Posts
    1,460
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by swords View Post
    For my situation the specifics of "intermediate - ultra highland" don't actually matter all that much on a practical level - do I heard gasping? Plants in those categories (over 1000m) are all grown in the HL chamber 70-75*F days and 50*F nights. Plants in the first two columns are grown in the LL 80-90*F days and 70-80*F nights.
    For my situation I have three areas, LL and HL tanks like swords and the intermediates grow on racks. I have no nep species in the extreme catagories except one. I have two diatas that grow and pitcher profusley in the same tank where glabrata, hamata and argentii do as well. Since diatas is listed as UHL, does this mean they have a wider distribution than some of the others on the list?
    It's a tough life being a Sarracenia farmer
    My Grow List http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=123776

Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •