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Thread: Nepenthes Attitudinal Distribution Chart

  1. #33
    villosaholic Heli's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lance View Post
    . The UHLs are the ones like villosa and lamnii which need 40*F temps more so as they age.
    That idea is still in debate as some villosas have been easier as they got bigger and in fact more heat tolerant. 40F Isnt necessary at all anyways and temperature differential is equally important. Mass and Dave Evans grow villosa with relatively warm nights with great success.

  2. #34
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    Really great chart! For anyone using it, it should be kept in mind however that altitude is not the only factor determining highland or lowland conditions. I quote here from a paper on montane cloud forest habitat in Southeast Asia; tromping ground of Nepenthes. They're obviously only focusing on highland habitat, but it could be applied to all habitat types I'm sure:

    "A clear demarcation of tropical montane cloud forests
    is difficult, as their altitudinal range depends on prevailing
    local climatic conditions (Bruijnzeel et al. 1993). For
    example, cloud forests generally occur at altitudes of 1200
    meters (m) on coastal and isolated ridges or on mountain
    summits where gnarled tree forms are dominant and cloud
    formation is frequent. However, cloud forests can also occur
    between 2000 and 3000 m on large inland mountains, and
    as low as 500 m above sea level on small islands (Bruijnzeel
    et al. 1993). Cloud forests are therefore defined in this review
    as “forests that are predominantly covered in cloud or mist,”
    where the influence of temperature and humidity is significant
    (Bruijnzeel 2000)."
    *

    * Taken from "Up in the Clouds: Is Sustainable use of Tropical Montane Cloud Forests Possible in Malaysia?" by Peh et al. in Bioscience magazine, 2011 (have to cite my sources He he)

    How you would integrate that kind of complexity into a chart as this I don't know, but it's good to keep in mind that growing conditions shouldn't be based solely on altitude..
    Da' mishu
    Provo, Utah.

    My Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...29#post1089429

  3. #35
    Maiden's Avatar
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    Amazing info, thanx a lot for sharing this!

  4. #36
    Maiden's Avatar
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    Err

    I think ramispina, faizaliana and tenuis are highlanders.

    And for hamata, from what i hear, the specie is not so picky about temp drop, 18-19C at night is good. At least for aw nep hamata clone 1. Maybe this clone came from lower altitude.

    Happy 2014 folks.
    Last edited by Maiden; 12-28-2013 at 11:08 PM.

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    Very Informative! Thank you.

  6. #38
    villosaholic Heli's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maiden View Post
    Err

    I think ramispina, faizaliana and tenuis are highlanders.

    And for hamata, from what i hear, the specie is not so picky about temp drop, 18-19C at night is good. At least for aw nep hamata clone 1. Maybe this clone came from lower altitude.

    Happy 2014 folks.
    I know this is very old but I would disagree. This is based on altitude range, not temperature tolerance. N. tenuis only grows at around 1000 meters, which is certainly considered intermediate. The other species also grow at a wide range but overall I think should be considered intermediate. N. hamata definitely should be considered a highlander because again, this is based on altitude range, not temperature tolerances.

  7. #39
    Maiden's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by plant#1 View Post
    Very Informative! Thank you.
    No problem mate :-)
    Maiden

  8. #40
    Maiden's Avatar
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    Heli: its your opinion. Thanks for your input. For myself, Andreas Wistuba said these are HL, i think he know what he talk about.

    Cheers
    Maiden

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