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Thread: Min-Max temps for nepenthes Bellii & campanulata ?

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    Min-Max temps for nepenthes Bellii & campanulata ?

    I have did my homework on both plants in there natural environments, min temp is what I'm concerned about as I doubt I will ever exceed the 95 degree max temp in their environment. It appears like the campanulate only has lows of 75 degrees in its Borneo environment, but what I have read it seems like the Bellii is more sensitive to low temps even though the philippeans get a few degrees cooler.

    I have them in a 55 gallon tank, some natural (north window) & daylight 6500k fluorescent supplemented lighting. Growing in sphagnum with some orchid bark substrate. I also have a small computer fan that kicks on twice a day for circulation in an otherwise enclosed setup. I have been very successful in the past with this setup.

    Anyways, The only thing I'm changing from my past growing experience is the temp, I am now more conscious of the fuel bill than I was 10 years ago. I let my house get down to 65 at night and the room the plants are in probably gets down to about 60 (just guessing) I already have it thought out that I could place a 50 watt heat lamp below the growing area, but don't want to if I don't have to.

    Just looking for opinions from those who know,
    Thanks,
    Dan

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    mass's Avatar
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    If you learn temps to elev. of plant's growth, it get's a lot easier to know/remember what's what. That's how I learned.
    Michael put together an extremely useful chart for all of this: http://www.michaelkevinsmith.com/nep...ure-Chart.html

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    instigator thez_yo's Avatar
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    Campanulata hates 45 at night and 65 by day. Don't give it highland conditions, and it crept along at intermediate temps too. I'd go with warm intermediate conditions for it at the chilliest.

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    Aristoloingulamata Dexenthes's Avatar
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    Edit: Thez, keep in mind those first temps you mentioned are pretty much ultra-highland conditions.

    I can't vouch for either of those two species seeing as I've never grown them, however I believe that many lowlanders can deal with night temps that are below optimum. Of the three lowlanders I have grown: ampullaria, bicalcarata and now clipeata (clipeata x eymae), I would have to say that they all have (mostly) survived in highland conditions.

    The ampullaria really did pout in highland conditions, growth was extremely slow and the pitchers were very small, but it did not die due to temperatures. Bicalcarata was similar as well, really slow growth, and very small or no pitchers in highland conditions, but as long as the humidity was high, it would continue growing at least.

    Where as highlanders simply cannot tolerate lowland temperatures. They will rapidly decline and die.

    If you want really rewarding healthy growth you will probably need to keep the night time temperatures at about 70.

    If you want to own the plants and just have them do what they can, they may be able to withstand highland temperatures if they are large, healthy plants to begin with and all other environmental factors are considered.

    For instance:

    N. bicalcarata in highland conditions



    In lowland conditions:

    LOOKING FOR: N. (argentii x bicalcarata) x {[(lingulata x edwardsiana) x (naga x hamata)] x [(klossii x undulatifolia) x (aristolochioides x rajah)]} Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=124586

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    I guess I should add that I turn the heat up to 68 during the day and the lights are probably good for a few more degrees on this 55 gallon tank. I used to have dart frogs and monitored the temps pretty good, but I don't have darts anymore and don't want to heat the tank if I don't have to.

    It's nighttime temps / gone to work temps that approach the 60 degree mark in this room. Maybe I better dig out my old min max thermometer from the dart frogs and look at getting a heat lamp that I would place below the tank to warm the substrate.

    Dan

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    31drew31's Avatar
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    I also have to heat a tank for LL's and using a heat light is one of the most inefficient ways to do that. Human heating pads, or heat tape/reptile heat pads use much less watts and can be left on all the time with little worry of it falling down and burning the carpet or house down like a heat light could.

    I use a Sunbeam heat pad ($20) that has a high, medium and low setting. On high I get 86 degrees during the day, and 72ish at night.

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    i dont do pots. amphirion's Avatar
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    i've come to the understanding that N. campanulata is more of a warm intermediate rather than a true lowlander. it will appreciate temps into the 80s, and night temps down towards maybe 70s-ish? my deduction about its temperature requirements comes from the observation that it grows notably along cliffsides with running/misting waterfalls which would provide a cooler microclimate than the rest of the region...could be wrong, but the fact that it croaked in my petiolaris tank definitely proves it isnt a true lowlander...
    " You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means." -Inigo Montoya
    +growlist
    +petiolaris drosera going dormant?
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    Quote Originally Posted by 31drew31 View Post
    I also have to heat a tank for LL's and using a heat light is one of the most inefficient ways to do that. Human heating pads, or heat tape/reptile heat pads use much less watts and can be left on all the time with little worry of it falling down and burning the carpet or house down like a heat light could.

    I use a Sunbeam heat pad ($20) that has a high, medium and low setting. On high I get 86 degrees during the day, and 72ish at night.
    Makes sense to use a pad, I'm a little nervous using a reptile heat pad as I had one on a custom size tank and it cracked the bottom ! This was 10 years ago when I was growing nepenthes. Don't really know why it cracked, had multiple guesses, one was maybe pouring in cooler distiller water on warm glass ? The other reason was this was a large tank (4 foot X 4 foot x 5 feet tall) and maybe I didnt have it sitting square on its stand, just dont know. yep I used to be a nepenthes growing fool Lol, I want to keep the madness small scale this time around.

    Thanks for everyones advice / opinions,
    Dan

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