Page 20 of 21 FirstFirst ... 10161718192021 LastLast
Results 191 to 200 of 210

Thread: N. campanulata appreciation thread!

  1. #191
    Red Lowii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    456
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    What do people think about these two pitchers? There is a background story to the two pitchers which I will mention at a later stage, but in terms of N.campanulata pitcher morphology, what do people think about these two? do they appear to be pure species?

    I love the smell of nep pollen in the morning..........smells like victory

  2. #192
    Red Lowii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    456
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I love the smell of nep pollen in the morning..........smells like victory

  3. #193
    Red Lowii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    456
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Last edited by Red Lowii; 07-09-2016 at 07:52 AM.
    I love the smell of nep pollen in the morning..........smells like victory

  4. #194
    Red Lowii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    456
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)




    I love the smell of nep pollen in the morning..........smells like victory

  5. #195

    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    70
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Izumiae x (Truncata x campanulata ) my camp like clone.
    Short cinematic documentaries on current science- moderndaydocs.com

  6. #196
    instigator thez_yo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    San Diego, USA
    Posts
    4,945
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Red Lowii View Post
    What do people think about these two pitchers? There is a background story to the two pitchers which I will mention at a later stage, but in terms of N.campanulata pitcher morphology, what do people think about these two? do they appear to be pure species?

    By pitchers shape, yes. The spots on that first one though - looks like the campy x max I've got from Wistuba, colour-wise. Someone in the hobby has a completely red-pitchered campy too. I'll try to dig up the pics, as I think it might have been on another forum.

    What's the story?

    I want all these campies

  7. #197

    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    70
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would say this camp has different type of coloration pattern then maxima or the camp maxima hybrid. This camp has splotching that is seen running throughout the pitcher but maxima has more defined markings.
    (not my plant)
    Short cinematic documentaries on current science- moderndaydocs.com

  8. #198
    Red Lowii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    456
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by thez_yo View Post
    By pitchers shape, yes. The spots on that first one though - looks like the campy x max I've got from Wistuba, colour-wise. Someone in the hobby has a completely red-pitchered campy too. I'll try to dig up the pics, as I think it might have been on another forum.

    What's the story?

    I want all these campies
    Hi thez_yo

    Essentially the reason i posted those photos, is that to my knowledge recently some N. campanulata seedlings were sold off by a German grower who is known for having some very unique/one off clones of every nepenthes you can imagine, and these N. campanulata's were no exception. Unfortunately the seedlings sold out before I even knew about them being offered for sale.

    As raiseitup01, has mentioned I do not believe maxima is present in these plants, though as you have pointed out the colouration/pigmentation/speckling is very much at odds with the N. campanulata clones we are used to seeing in cultivation and those that Chien took insitu photos of.

    Whilst i can only speculate about the origin of these plants, I do believe they came into cultivation the very same way that all campanulata clones came into cultivation, from seed collected by Chien. From what I understand, all TC and seed grown material came from this seed collection event, possibly even all from the very same flower.

    The pitcher morphology looks to be inline with that of campanulata and I have visited the habitat myself and apart from N. faizaliana, fusca and veitchii, there isn't much else that is known to grow around Mulu that could have hybridised with camp and if a hybrid event did occur at some point, more of the other parent's genes would be expressed. So this leads me to think that potentially the mainly green pitchering clones that we are familiar with in cultivation, with the exception of Hardy's plant, may not necessarily encapsulate the full spectrum of N. campanulata variation OR there could be residual genetics present, that may only express themselves through cross breeding. A bit like Exotica's red truncata breeding program, where the original parents did not really exhibit red colouration but the offspring did and subsequent re-crossing of the red flush clones led to a second generation grex of truncata's exhibiting these red flush traits far more than the first generation.
    Last edited by Red Lowii; 07-28-2016 at 07:17 PM.
    I love the smell of nep pollen in the morning..........smells like victory

  9. #199
    Red Lowii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    456
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    After reading virtually every post I could find on growers who grew N. campanulata well, and those who made mistakes, and relating it back to what I witnessed in the habitat, I think I have narrowed down the do's and don't of growing N. campanulata cultiavation:

    1 - In the wild N.campanulata grows on limestone vertical rock, often haning down from icicles of limestone.
    I have seen success achieved from a few growers with a variety of media, ranging from burnt earth, to sphagnum.
    As it naturally grows in limestone, I think a mix of something that is a little more Alkaline, with a pH of around 8 (limestone dust) could be good practice.
    Note that both the Mulu habitat and the original Gunung Ilas Bungaan habitat in east Kalimantan, both were limestone outcrops and N. campanulata grows
    around 300metres on both of these. It does not grow on the ground or lower than that altitude.

    2 - Being a few hundred metres on the side of the vertical rock, air circulation must be good, and therefore two factors are critical, the media must occasionally dry out between watering and yes a fan is probably a good idea.

    3 - Due to the good air flow that I mentioned in point 2, the plants likely never overheat or get to the same level as lowlanders like ampullaria, raff and bical do, just a few hundred metres below. Yet being at 300metres-500metres, it is still low enough for the temperature to be considered warm and i think this is where the confusion has arisen and it mistakenly has been grouped into the Lowlander category. Therefore it should NOT be treated as a typical lowlander and typical lowland conditions will not suffice long term. It should be treated as one of those unique species with specific requirements, like pervillei, vieillardii & madagascariensis

    4 - Whilst the media should dry out between watering, for good growth humidity fluctuations/swings that the plant experiences daily in the wild, should be simulated. So I think it is best practice to not grow it in 99% humidity, 99% of the time, like you would do with N. bicalcarata/ N. ampullaria. Swings are recommended. I have seen it grown successfully in constantly low humidity by one grower, but by his account it grew very slow. So I think a good balance of humidity fluctuations are recommended.

    5 - And finally, the plants that grew in the wild, received maybe a few hours of direct light, mostly they were sheltered by the limestone and the mist, so full on direct sunlight is not recommended, reports of leaves yellowing out and poor pitcher production have been reported in such conditions. Dappled or filtered light is probably best practice to simulate what they would experience in the wild.
    I love the smell of nep pollen in the morning..........smells like victory

  10. #200
    Red Lowii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    456
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I love the smell of nep pollen in the morning..........smells like victory

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •