Page 21 of 21 FirstFirst ... 111718192021
Results 201 to 210 of 210

Thread: N. campanulata appreciation thread!

  1. #201
    Red Lowii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    469
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Where's the line drawing??

    https://www.sbg.org.sg/images/4_4_Re...GBS_pg.227.pdf



    http://www.carnivorousplants.org/cpn...v43n1p7_13.pdf

    "Prey capture
    N. campanulata traps mostly small flies and ants, along with the occasional beetle, cricket, or moth (Fig. 3). This prey-capture profile is typical for a species with small, yellow pitchers that are produced at or above canopy level (Moran 1996; Bonhomme et al. 2011). However, it is highly atypical for a species that has a reduced peristome and well-developed waxy zone. The small peristome/well-developed waxy zone character combination has been referred to in recent ecological studies as “dry type”. The pitchers of most Nepenthes species can be divided into two groups, called “wet type” and “dry type” (Bauer et al. 2012; Moran et al. 2013). Wet type pitchers tend to have a broad peristome and a reduced (or no) waxy zone. The peristome relies on moisture to function, and so species with “wet type” pitchers are confined to habitats that are almost permanently moist. By contrast, dry type pitchers have narrower peristomes and welldeveloped waxy zones. While the peristomes of dry type pitchers are less effective than those of wet type ones, the waxy zone remains effective even if the weather is dry. Furthermore, the wax crystals are better at retaining water than glandular surfaces, so dry type pitchers are more efficient in places where occasional, short term
    water deficiencies occur. One thing that is intriguing about the prey caught by N. campanulata pitchers is that dry type pitchers are thought to be more effective Figure 3: Histogram showing the proportional composition of arthropod prey taxa in Nepenthes campanulata pitchers.Volume 43 March 2014 11 at trapping crawling prey, such as ants, and less effective at trapping flying prey, such as small flies "
    Last edited by Red Lowii; 08-06-2016 at 06:03 AM.
    I love the smell of nep pollen in the morning..........smells like victory

  2. #202
    Red Lowii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    469
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)




    I love the smell of nep pollen in the morning..........smells like victory

  3. #203
    Red Lowii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    469
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    What do people think of this image?

    I love the smell of nep pollen in the morning..........smells like victory

  4. #204

    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    70
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't know about all those generalizations regarding wet and dry types...but these in situ picture and Chien are AWESOME!
    Short cinematic documentaries on current science- moderndaydocs.com

  5. #205
    Grey Moss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,050
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I wonder how any of the seed makes it back onto the cliff wall instead of falling down to the forest below.

  6. #206
    Red Lowii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    469
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Reason I added that link, is that it seems obvious to me that the scope of variation that exist within N. campanulata is greater than what we currently identify as N. campanulata.

    Whilst the original location of Mt Ilas Bungaan likely had green/yellow pitchering plants, as identified by Kostermans, we will likely never know the extent of the variation and colour is unfortunately lost in taxonomic samples.

    The colourful form that I posted photos of are approximately 15km away from the location where Chien had collected seed and I don't know where the German grower obtained his clone of N. campanulata, but it looks remarkably similar to the one found at that location.

    Colour aside, the pitcher morphology seems to not diverge that much from what is typical for N. campanulata. The rim of the peristome seems to be just a little bit more rounded and pronounced than what is typical of the green forms.

    When I showed the images of the colourful N. campanulata's to a few other growers, they were immediately dismissed as being hybrids, yet I have been to the location and the only other nepenthes that feature within a 20km radius are hurrelliana, lowii, muluensis, tentaculata, vogelii, veitchii, faizaliana.

    For arguments sake, say faizaliana was a contributing parent, a faizaliana x campanulata cross does not exist in cultivation, but a close contender boschiana x campanulata does. There are a number of overlapping characteristics between boschiana and faizaliana so I think it would be ok to speculate the offspring to look something like this.





    There would be significantly more peristome as well as a host of other features that would give it away as being a hybrid, even some mild introgression and continuous campanulata back breeding over a number of generations I believe would still give away the other hybrid parents. It's almost impossible with the exception of maybe inermis as a breeding parent to diminish the peristome of a campanulata hybrid, back to something that resembles N. campnulata.

    The only possibilility that I'm willing to entertain is a hybrid between campanulata and muluensis.



    [IMG]http://*******nepenthes.com/Images/2011-6-26-Nepenthes_Greenhouse/DSC_2015.JPG[/IMG]



    N. muluensis does have the petite peristome on the upper pitchers and is quite small in stature. This would not account for the lack of vining that these colourful campanulata pitchers produce, and with the exception of the underside of the leaf being red (if you look very closely in the photo), the leaf shape seems to resemble campanulata. The biggest contrasting factor, aside from the colour of the pitchers and the thickness of the peristome is the dark colour of the leaf lamina and the absense of the pennate veins that are so characteristic of the campanulata's in cultivation and those pictured above deer cave by Chien.



    I've added this comparison to further illustrate the variation that is present, in just the one population group, above deer cave, from where the seed that represents almost all if not all the cultivated plants that are in collections today.



    Images labelled 1 & 2, display the similarity between the wild specimen and that of the German grower.

    And 7 & 8 show that the same population on the same rock, and clear divergence in leaf tip morphology, with one being acute and quite peltate, with a dimple like depression towards the very edge of the leaf where it meets the tendril in photo 8 and truncate leaf ending in photo 7.
    I love the smell of nep pollen in the morning..........smells like victory

  7. #207
    clippity-clip-clip Clue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    SF Bay Area & Davis
    Posts
    1,935
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've noticed lots of variation in N. campanulata pitchers in cultivation. I have to say that the strangest ones, however, are Sam Estes' large plants which have really broad peristomes but are no doubt also just N. campanulata, especially since the foliage is always consistent; it appears that the truncate leaf apex appears from larger, more robust plants but isn't by itself a marker of maturity. The teeth on my plants are very variable, with the BE plant only showing tiny teeth that can only be seen when the pitcher has just opened - afterwards the peristome thickens and I can't see any teeth anymore. My MT plant has a much thinner peristome basically made of its teeth, more like Kurata's description. It's been warm lately so my MT plant hasn't show much red in the recent pitchers, but so far the coloration is only inside the pitcher, without any spots on the outside of the pitcher.

    Nepenthes campanulata

    Nepenthes campanulata MT red

    Nepenthes campanulata MT red

    Nepenthes campanulata

    Nepenthes campanulata MT red

    Nepenthes campanulata BE
    "I, for one, can't wait to grow Nepenthes extincta!"
    Plant List ; blog

  8. #208
    clippity-clip-clip Clue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    SF Bay Area & Davis
    Posts
    1,935
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Teeth on my red MT plant:

    N. campanulata Red MT

    Sam Estes' plant:
    N. campanulata - Sh.Kurata | fLORA nepenthaceae
    Last edited by Clue; 08-15-2016 at 03:07 PM.
    "I, for one, can't wait to grow Nepenthes extincta!"
    Plant List ; blog

  9. #209
    clippity-clip-clip Clue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    SF Bay Area & Davis
    Posts
    1,935
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A year + some-odd months of growth compressed into 7 seconds:

    "I, for one, can't wait to grow Nepenthes extincta!"
    Plant List ; blog

  10. #210
    Greetings from the netherworld. curtisconners's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Columbus Ohio, U.S.
    Posts
    923
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Dumb question, but where did you get the pot? I really like it.
    The profile pic that you see above is my actual photo. I am a hyper-intelligent snake that has learned to use the internet and I will eventually rule you all.

    Just kidding..... Or am I?

Page 21 of 21 FirstFirst ... 111718192021

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •