User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Leaf Tip Browning

  1. #1
    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1,824
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Leaf Tip Browning

    I received my first nep a little over two weeks ago. When I received it, the very tip of the leaf on the plant was split. In the two weeks time I've had it, the tip of the leaf has browned. This nep doesn't have very many large leaves and I would like to try to save it because I want it to look bushier. I know with orchids you can cut the browning part off and put cinnamon, a natural fungicide, on the open cut. Is that possible with neps too, or will the entire leaf decay after that? Is there any way I can save the leaf?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    UnstuckinTime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    486
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Depending on how drastic the change has been from the original growing conditions to yours, die off like that is to be expected in most cases. I don't think there is anything that can be done for the one leaf, but, if the shoot apical meristem* is still growing, and your conditions are right, you'll get that "bushy" look soon enough.

    What Nepenthes did you get?

    *(Pardon the scientific terminology, in addition to being a nerd and a plant biology student, using the phrase "if the growing tip is still growing" kinda bothered me, hahahaha)

    -CJ
    "The plants you grow, end up growing you."


    My Grow List:
    http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=123995

  3. #3
    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1,824
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by UnstuckinTime View Post
    Depending on how drastic the change has been from the original growing conditions to yours, die off like that is to be expected in most cases. I don't think there is anything that can be done for the one leaf, but, if the shoot apical meristem* is still growing, and your conditions are right, you'll get that "bushy" look soon enough.

    What Nepenthes did you get?

    *(Pardon the scientific terminology, in addition to being a nerd and a plant biology student, using the phrase "if the growing tip is still growing" kinda bothered me, hahahaha)

    -CJ
    It's a hybrid of N. talangensis and N. ventricosa. It seems to be growing extremely fast in 90% humidity under 55w lighting. It's put out one new leaf and now has a 6" stem about to turn into a leaf in the time I've had it. It's two basal shoots have grown 1.5"-2" stems in the past week. Hopefully I'll get the bushy look shortly.

    So I guess I can't really do anything about the leaf then. Thanks for the help!

  4. #4
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,875
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    In an atmosphere of constant 90% humidity, you are at risk of encouraging diseases. If you get a lot of soft growth (which you will in a closed, humid environment), it will be prone to infection by bacterial leaf spot diseases, which will quickly kill a plant. I don't think you want that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pineapple View Post
    Hopefully I'll get the bushy look shortly.
    You should be aware that Nepenthes are notoriously slow-growing plants, so you may find you will adjust your expectations over the next year ;-) Many Nepenthes will take three to six months (or more in some cases) to adjust to their new growing environment and will appear to grow very little or not at all during that settling in phase. I have had plants take six months before they made their first pitcher. Its not unusual. That said, if you make too much of an effort to "push" Nepenthes before they are properly established, you can do more harm than good. Nepenthes are patience plants!

  5. #5
    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1,824
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    In an atmosphere of constant 90% humidity, you are at risk of encouraging diseases. If you get a lot of soft growth (which you will in a closed, humid environment), it will be prone to infection by bacterial leaf spot diseases, which will quickly kill a plant. I don't think you want that.



    You should be aware that Nepenthes are notoriously slow-growing plants, so you may find you will adjust your expectations over the next year ;-) Many Nepenthes will take three to six months (or more in some cases) to adjust to their new growing environment and will appear to grow very little or not at all during that settling in phase. I have had plants take six months before they made their first pitcher. Its not unusual. That said, if you make too much of an effort to "push" Nepenthes before they are properly established, you can do more harm than good. Nepenthes are patience plants!
    In a few weeks, they will be moved into the greenhouse, which I am setting up tomorrow. The humidity should be around 60-70%. I'll lower the humidity in the terrarium to 70%. Thanks for letting me know!

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •