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Thread: Going Shopping

  1. #9
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    Why has nobody suggested hybrids? Many hybrids are far more forgiving, and tolerant of extremes/ errors in culture. They often have the advantage of being very vigorous. Many are also incredibly beautiful.

  2. #10
    Mr. veitchii mikefallen13's Avatar
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    Hybrids with ventricosa and maxima in them are very easy to grow and often very beautiful, I would recommend them to a beginner. Another hybrid I'd recommend is truncata x veitchii HL, I really love this plant and it's very forgiving and very beautiful as it matures
    Good Growing!
    -Mike Fallen

    My Growlist/wishlist: http://highlandtropicals.blogspot.co...-growlist.html

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    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    For example, N. ventricosa X N. spectabilis:

    [IMG]http://**************************************/2011/12/vent-spec0032.jpg[/IMG]

    Easy to grow, vigor like no tomorrow, and adaptable to a range of conditions. It is also very likely to be tolerant of mistakes. As Mike said, any of the N. maxima hybrids are going to be extremely rewarding for the beginner, as are many of the fine N. ventricosa crosses. N. Miranda, anyone?!

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    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    I wouldn't get the rafflesiana. While large plants can be tough for lowlanders, small ones can quickly wither and dry out if not kept in warm, humid conditions.

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    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    What are your day and night temperatures for much of the year? If I recall you mentioned you are zone 9/10?? My biggest concern is your heat through most of the year. Zone 9/10 you are going to have hot hot hot and warm nights for months on end. Shade on the greenhouse evaporative cooling will only go so far, the big issue will be your night temperatures during Spring/Summer/Fall. Anything remotely highland will wither and die. So you have to decide.. pick plants that can take the few weeks of cold but will shrivel up the rest of the year from the heat. Or get plants that will be happy for the other 90% of the year but will need some heat for those few cold weeks/spells.
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  6. #14
    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by corky View Post
    stay away from anything too expensive cheap plants can still be great plants,sanguinea and khasiana are a must,fast growing plants are what i would go for and when they are up and going look towards the slower and more expensive,why no ventricosa i think they are very under rated,they are cheap easy growing and i think they look good
    Yeah, I'm actually just going to buy a couple cheap plants, maybe $20 max.

    I have a Ventricosa x Talangensis. I don't like the pitchers on Ventricosa though. If I see one in a color that I like for a good price, I'll snatch it up! I'm up for getting anything as long as the pitchers are nice lol.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dexenthes View Post
    From what I understand and in my experience, hamata is not necessarily all that difficult, but that talangensis and singalana are not really easy plants. They require higher humidity (I think) than most. Also macrophylla is not a beginners plant by any means especially considering how expensive they can be.

    My advice would be to get burkei, maxima, copelandii, maybe alba, vogellii and if you feel like you are ready for it a hamata that can be your baby that you pamper a little more.

    I would stay away from lowlanders because in any attempt to make them really happy you will sacrifice the necessary conditions for your highlanders. Also without their true lowland temps they will just pout and take up space not doing much.
    I really want a Hamata due to their teeth and pitcher shape. The nice colors are a bonus. I won't go out of my way to buy one, but if I stumble upon a cheap, healthy, pretty one, I might as well get it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    Why has nobody suggested hybrids? Many hybrids are far more forgiving, and tolerant of extremes/ errors in culture. They often have the advantage of being very vigorous. Many are also incredibly beautiful.
    Last night I had a brief discussion in the chat about hybrids. Generally, anything crossed with really simple growers (Vent/Trunc/ect.) is fairly easy to keep, in most cases. I really like hybrids too, so I may get one if I find one that I like.

    Quote Originally Posted by mikefallen13 View Post
    Hybrids with ventricosa and maxima in them are very easy to grow and often very beautiful, I would recommend them to a beginner. Another hybrid I'd recommend is truncata x veitchii HL, I really love this plant and it's very forgiving and very beautiful as it matures
    I'll keep an eye out for hybrids in that case. I REALLY like Mass's Veitchii K, so I'm keeping my eyes peeled for one of them.

    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    For example, N. ventricosa X N. spectabilis:

    Easy to grow, vigor like no tomorrow, and adaptable to a range of conditions. It is also very likely to be tolerant of mistakes. As Mike said, any of the N. maxima hybrids are going to be extremely rewarding for the beginner, as are many of the fine N. ventricosa crosses. N. Miranda, anyone?!
    Beautiful hybrid! I will definitely be on the lookout for hybrids now!

    Quote Originally Posted by Cthulhu138 View Post
    I wouldn't get the rafflesiana. While large plants can be tough for lowlanders, small ones can quickly wither and dry out if not kept in warm, humid conditions.
    So if there's a large refflesiana it would be okay to get, but I should stay away from small ones?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Paroubek View Post
    What are your day and night temperatures for much of the year? If I recall you mentioned you are zone 9/10?? My biggest concern is your heat through most of the year. Zone 9/10 you are going to have hot hot hot and warm nights for months on end. Shade on the greenhouse evaporative cooling will only go so far, the big issue will be your night temperatures during Spring/Summer/Fall. Anything remotely highland will wither and die. So you have to decide.. pick plants that can take the few weeks of cold but will shrivel up the rest of the year from the heat. Or get plants that will be happy for the other 90% of the year but will need some heat for those few cold weeks/spells.
    I would say from the beginning of fall into a bit of spring, it stays pretty cool. It only gets hot around May through August. In the hot, dry months, I can definitely run a swamp cooler without issues. In the cold, wet months, I would be afraid to run a heater for very long. With lowlanders, I would need to keep the greenhouse really warm 24/7 in the winter. I'm afraid of leaving the heater on unattended because of my friend's greenhouse that burned down a few years back due to heating malfunctions. The zone I'm in is really based upon the minimum temperature rather than maximum. It does gert hot here, but it's not Texas. Last summer we had a few weeks of 50s-60s, and that was right in the middle of July! It usually gets up to 90 during the summer, with the occasional 100, but that's rare. In the winter, it usually stays around 35, but it can get down below freezing, however that is rare as well. I think HL would be a better choice for my climate zone, as the temperature can be controlled without me worrying in the summer. I won't pile on the plants until I know how they can make it through the hot months though. I can always adjust as I go along.

  7. #15
    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
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    Here's what I got...

    N. x Peter Damato x Maxima


    N. Singalana 'Belirang'


    N. Densiflora x Spectablilis


    Any tips? The guy at the nursery said they were all relatively easy to keep and fast growing. Should I watch the humidity for any of them? The N. Peter Damato x Maxima was sitting in a tray with 1/2" of water and the other two were sitting on a rack. Should I put it in a tray of water if it's in a 80% humidity terrarium?

  8. #16
    Sphagnum Guru Wire Man's Avatar
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    I would have gone for N. burkei. Mine is growing faster than N. maxima at room temps. N. ramispina is another good option to consider for later.

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