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Thread: Problems pitchering

  1. #9
    swords's Avatar
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    My HLers get 65-75*f days and 40-50*F nights year round even in summer (with AC) right now they can get down to 40*F overnight and nobody complains. Some of those like N. vogelii who like it warmer grow a little slower at these temps but two of my N. lowiis popped out their biggest leaves yet and the temps are are their coolest.

    I realize that's difficult to do for folks in warmer climates without relying on expensive cooling measures (AC) but it appears to be a metabolic need of these plants to get the steep cooling at night. I've had HLers burn out (or nearly so) in warm conditions because they don't get these mini-dormancies every night. They just grow and grow getting smaller and smaller instead of larger but this can be stopped/reversed by moving to cool HL conditions. So that's why I myself prefer to err cooler on HLers especially since many are not so cheap.

  2. #10
    Not Growing Up! GrowinOld's Avatar
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    Agree whole-heartedly!
    Illustrates the point a seem to always bring up,
    one size doesn't fit all,
    so even amongst the few "groups" we designate of H.L./L.L. & Intermediate,
    each plant will have its own unique preferences for temperature, humidity, lighting, etc.
    So not all Highlanders want exactly the same conditions... hence one of the reasons that
    one plant may be doing better than another, even though they are from the came "group".

    As mentioned also, some plants grow faster than others, or have their own strong points too.

    It is for this reason that actually growing plants and learning their language & what they are telling you they need, is the best way to master the hobby. (Like oh! my leaves seem anemic...! I need light, food, cooler or warmer temps, etc.)

    Without knowing someone else's conditions, (like lights, temps, efforts at humidity, etc.) how thcan others hope to guess what the causes of the problems are? Especially if we have to guess what the conditions are too!

    And I agree that the lighting could be boosted a bit, although the middle plant seems to be greener than previous leaves on it... likely new plants (less than 3 months old) or new conditions. As far as humidity, the plant pots, leaves and trays look bone dry to me!

    (See how we have to think like Sherlock Holmes in order to figure out the conditions too, as they weren't provided. This is so common for so many people to do here!
    Indeed, at least a picture was provided this time, so we are ahead of the game compared to most!
    By the way, don't people read up on plants & how to care for them... if not before, but at least right after purchasing them? Especially expensive ones!

    Well again, good luck. Swords & others have given a lot of good info. Bottom line is, you can't grow plants well, if you don't give them the conditions they want & need. With many plants, close is not good enough! They need what they need!
    Experience is the best teacher. At least it used to be.
    But then, common sense isn't so common anymore, is it.


    http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=113866

  3. #11
    Lover of Mountains nightsky's Avatar
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    I've had two issues be the primary cause of my plants not pitchering: not enough light, and adjusting to conditions. Regarding the seconds point, after I first recieved a spectabilis, despite being in ideal conditions (correct temps, good humidity, excellent light) it took 15 months to make its first pitcher. Once it did, it did so consistently.

    In your case, I bet once spring rolls around and light increases you'll start seeing some pitchers.

  4. #12

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    Sorry for omitting information about the ambient conditions. I did not think that they were particularly out of the ordinary for the requirements of such species.

    Daytime conditions reach 70, nighttime conditions drop to 55.

    Sunlight is afternoon, direct sun in the windowsill. Direct sun is for most of the afternoon.

    Ambient humidity is around 70%.

    I live in the southern hemisphere so we just entered our summer phase. The light has increased, and it is warmer than in the winter. January and February are the warmest times of the year although we have had a very mild summer this year. March and April will see the temperatures start to drop again.

    I've had these three with me since August and I have not moved their location or changed the setup. That is why I'm puzzled about the halt in pitcher production.

    Each of the possible causes is puzzling. My light has increased, if anything, and I believe heat stress is exhibited in the form of smaller and smaller leaves which is not happening here. Humidity has not changed.

  5. #13
    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by b.t. View Post
    Sorry for omitting information about the ambient conditions. I did not think that they were particularly out of the ordinary for the requirements of such species.

    Daytime conditions reach 70, nighttime conditions drop to 55.

    Sunlight is afternoon, direct sun in the windowsill. Direct sun is for most of the afternoon.

    Ambient humidity is around 70%.

    I live in the southern hemisphere so we just entered our summer phase. The light has increased, and it is warmer than in the winter. January and February are the warmest times of the year although we have had a very mild summer this year. March and April will see the temperatures start to drop again.

    I've had these three with me since August and I have not moved their location or changed the setup. That is why I'm puzzled about the halt in pitcher production.

    Each of the possible causes is puzzling. My light has increased, if anything, and I believe heat stress is exhibited in the form of smaller and smaller leaves which is not happening here. Humidity has not changed.
    70% should be okay for most neps, but I read that ultra highlanders like Hamata enjoy saturated conditions where water condenses on their leaves overnight. Hamata is a less demanding ultra highlander, as I believe it was ranked by Nepenthes University at an intermediate care level. The humidity might not have to be as high. Try putting a bag around it and see if that cheers it up humidity wise. Other than that, everything seems fine, but lighting could definitely be higher.

    Good luck.

  6. #14
    Lover of Mountains nightsky's Avatar
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    Conditions seem good enough to me. I'd just leave them be and not mess with them too much. Just be patient and they should get back to it. Neps are fussy, so if one has issues, you mess with it, and then it gets more issues, and starts this feedback loop of sorts haha. I've found the best thing to do when conditions are good is just leave them alone.

  7. #15
    J NewspaperFort's Avatar
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    do you have them under grow lights or natural lighting?
    all of my nepenthes have generally stopped producing pitchers due to lack of natural sunlight
    they are growing, but not pitchering. i am not worried, im sure they will resume when the light comes back.

  8. #16
    Class 5 Nepenthes hoarder lance's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NewspaperFort View Post
    do you have them under grow lights or natural lighting?
    all of my nepenthes have generally stopped producing pitchers due to lack of natural sunlight
    they are growing, but not pitchering. i am not worried, im sure they will resume when the light comes back.
    No worries, this is natural. My Lowlanders are making mini leaves due to the lack of sunlight and extreme heat.


    In addition to growing plants, I design and build RC planes powered by Tesla batteries. Check out my progress at www.chargedplanes.com

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