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Thread: Problems pitchering

  1. #1

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    Problems pitchering

    I need some help.

    My aristo, jac, and hamata are putting out new healthy leaves for growth but pitcher production has stopped. Does it look like a heat issue, humidity issue, or a lack of sunlight?

    They were fine up to December....


  2. #2
    Not Growing Up! GrowinOld's Avatar
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    Lack of pitchering to me usually indicates a lack of enough humidity,
    however seeing as these are highlanders
    and you have not indicated at all what kind of environmental conditions you are giving the plants,
    it is a bit hard to suggest anything else...beyond a general lack of humidity,
    as I said.

    Another bit of info that may help people make a determination, is also knowing
    how long you have had these plants, and/or if you recently changed their conditions.

    (No matter what else you may hear, I would likely push up the lighting & humidity anyway.)
    Most people don't realize the impact good humidity has on pitchering,
    and from the pics, your plants don't look like they are "colored-up" to a big degree,
    so increasing the lighting can likely safely be done anyway, to the benefit of the plants.

    Good luck.
    Experience is the best teacher. At least it used to be.
    But then, common sense isn't so common anymore, is it.


    http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=113866

  3. #3
    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
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    I'm a newbie at this still, but for some odd reason, my N. ventricosa x talangensis won't pitcher. Given, I've only had it for a little over a month, but the truncata I got with it has already put out a leaf and starte to create a pitcher. My humidity is 90% and the temperature shifts between 64 and 78 from day to night. What I'm trying to get at is that maybe there will be no apparent reason for them not to pitcher. My plant is growing like a weed, twice the rate of my x Ventrata that is nearly three times the size. It just doesn't make sense. It could be some weird reason, like the potting medium, what you're watering with, feeding or even air flow.

    Think back to when they stopped pitchering. What did you change? Even something as simple as the weather could be a clue.

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    swords's Avatar
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    I'm gonna say it looks to me like BT has their plants on a windowsill, depending on where BT is the winter sun may be greatly diminished and thus be causing your lack of pitchers. The moss looks pretty good for open air and the tendrils don't appear to have dehydrated so the humidity might be OK (likely it's not ideal though I do see an older pitcher on the hamata). There would be no harm in adding a supplemental light and creating higher humidity environment for it. As Paul said, both will be of a benefit.

    Pineapple N. talangensis is a difficult one to pitcher anyway and it likes cold night temps to do well and yours don't get very cold at all so I'm not surprised it's not behaving. N. truncata is much more flexible on temps.

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    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by swords View Post
    I'm gonna say it looks to me like BT has their plants on a windowsill, depending on where BT is the winter sun may be greatly diminished and thus be causing your lack of pitchers. The moss looks pretty good for open air and the tendrils don't appear to have dehydrated so the humidity might be OK (likely it's not ideal though I do see an older pitcher on the hamata). There would be no harm in adding a supplemental light and creating higher humidity environment for it. As Paul said, both will be of a benefit.

    Pineapple N. talangensis is a difficult one to pitcher anyway and it likes cold night temps to do well and yours don't get very cold at all so I'm not surprised it's not behaving. N. truncata is much more flexible on temps.
    Oh... Well, crap. I guess it will love my greenhouse whem I move it out there.

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    roxorboxor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by swords View Post
    Pineapple N. talangensis is a difficult one to pitcher anyway and it likes cold night temps to do well and yours don't get very cold at all so I'm not surprised it's not behaving.
    Definitely this. I've had my little talangensis since last June, and its just now making me a little pitcher (which hopefully will inflate all the way now). It seems to take its dear sweet time adjusting to your growing conditions.

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    Sphagnum Guru Wire Man's Avatar
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    This is one time where my color deficiency gives me the upper hand! The newer leaves look a lot lighter than the older ones, so it's probably not enough light/long enough photo period. Feeling the leaves will help. I've noticed they're a lot softer when not given enough light.

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    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roxorboxor View Post
    Definitely this. I've had my little talangensis since last June, and its just now making me a little pitcher (which hopefully will inflate all the way now). It seems to take its dear sweet time adjusting to your growing conditions.
    So how cold do they like? Or better yet, how cold can they get without adverse affects?

    Sorry for hijacking the thread... But the OP's plants contain a few ultra highlanders, so it kinda fits in with the discussion.

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