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Thread: Oh Darn... In a Bit of Trouble!

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    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
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    Oh Darn... In a Bit of Trouble!

    Today I purchased two Nepenthes, both rather large. I was told that they were both highlanders, which proved true for one, but I was too dense to realize the species of one of the hybrids were of the lowland and ultra lowland variety! The lowlander is an N. x 'Momoka' (insignis x merrilliana)... Insignis being the ultra lowlander, merriliana being the lowlander... So what can I do to keep it alive, let alone happy? My night time temperatures are in the 50s, but on nights when it goes into the 40s I turn on the heater which keeps it in the high 50s. Daytime temperatures are ideally in the 80s, sometimes more if it's a hot day, sometimes less if its a cool day. I was told this cross grows well as an intermediate to highlander, which is why I bought it. Still a newbie at this stuff though. Any help will be appreciated!

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    Class 5 Nepenthes hoarder lance's Avatar
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    It will like the 80's day temps, but won't really like the 50's day temps at all. This winter my lowlanders experienced your type of highlander conditions and they stopped growing completely. To be honest (according to what I saw with my lowlanders this winter) the best thing to do would be to seal it off in your greenhouse somehow and vent a bit of the heaters exhaust in there, or give it away. SOme lowlanders can grow in highland conditions ( N. bicalarata) but their pitchers are a bit different. You should leave it alone first to see how it cops with the environment.


    In addition to growing plants, I design and build RC planes powered by Tesla batteries. Check out my progress at www.chargedplanes.com

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    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lance View Post
    It will like the 80's day temps, but won't really like the 50's day temps at all. This winter my lowlanders experienced your type of highlander conditions and they stopped growing completely. To be honest (according to what I saw with my lowlanders this winter) the best thing to do would be to seal it off in your greenhouse somehow and vent a bit of the heaters exhaust in there, or give it away. SOme lowlanders can grow in highland conditions ( N. bicalarata) but their pitchers are a bit different. You should leave it alone first to see how it cops with the environment.
    Thanks for the reply! I've only had my greenhouse up since the dead of winter, so it may get warmer than I expect in the summer. Since the dude I got it from said it grows well as an intermediate/highlander, let's hope that he grew it as that, because it obviously did well. If it does well I'll keep it, but if not, I know where I can give it a good home with a lowland chamber. How hot of temperatures can it take? Would it dislike being in a glass terrarium if it doesn't do well in the normal greenhouse temperatures? I don't want to roast it, hehe.

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    Class 5 Nepenthes hoarder lance's Avatar
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    as long as theres a good amount of humidity and some shade, then it should do fine in a lowland chamber.


    In addition to growing plants, I design and build RC planes powered by Tesla batteries. Check out my progress at www.chargedplanes.com

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    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
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    Just read a bit more about both species. Some people say they do well as intermediate. I read one account where insignis was grown as a highlander outside and only slowed growth in the winter, but liked the summer temperatures. Merrilliana does well as intermediate too. Maybe "hybrid vigor" appears in this cross allowing it to grow in warmer highland conditions, like mine? I'll post an update in a bit after I see how it does. I'll closely monitor growth. Thanks for the help, Lance!

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    Cardiac Nurse JB_OrchidGuy's Avatar
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    My bical hated 50's but I have my low set to 60 in the GH and everything's seems to be doing fine.

    Have to just play with it s lil. Never assume with hybrids.
    JB
    Friend me on facebook with JB_orchidguy@yahoo.com.
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    Sphagnum Guru Wire Man's Avatar
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    It's going to get huge, I can tell you that now. N. merilliana is a massive plant, and N. insignis forms basals readily, and the pitchers can attain massive size.

    It might be able to grow as an intermediate. N. x mixta and 'Miranda' can grow as both lowlanders and highlanders, even though both parents (maxima x northiana) are lowlanders. It all depends on what the parents plants are adapted to.

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    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wire Man View Post
    It's going to get huge, I can tell you that now. N. merilliana is a massive plant, and N. insignis forms basals readily, and the pitchers can attain massive size.

    It might be able to grow as an intermediate. N. x mixta and 'Miranda' can grow as both lowlanders and highlanders, even though both parents (maxima x northiana) are lowlanders. It all depends on what the parents plants are adapted to.
    Since the dude said it was an intermediate highlander, which is what he was growing it as, there's a good chance it is adaptable. It was a hobbyist I bought it from, so he had grown the plant himself and he probably knows what it likes. It will probably just slow down in the winter and it will love the summer I suppose.

    Pitcher on the right...


    New pitcher...

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