User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 35

Thread: Hot Highlanders

  1. #1
    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1,824
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Hot Highlanders

    In the Chatbox, I was told that 85F is too high for most highlanders. That became apparent to me when it got into the mid eighties. The pitchers on my N. boschiana x mira and my N. jacquelineae wilted. All of the other highlanders are as normal.

    Just curious about what highland species can take cool nights and warm days. If you know any, just throw them at me. I'm also interested in intermediate species.

    Temps are usually between 50-55F at night, but can get up to 60F... This is with the greenhouse heated on the coldest of winter nights. Temps range from 80-90F during the day at the absolute hottest, but will stay around 75F on a cool day.

    The reason I'm not growing LL... I rely on high humidity at night since it gets down to around 30% during a few hours of most days. If I run the heater, even to keep my highlanders warm enough, it drops the humidity significantly. To heat LLs on winter nights would be like... death by humidity deprivation lol. I'm making the decision that highlanders and intermediates that can deal with warmer temperatures during the day and cold temperatures at night are the best for me.

  2. #2
    hcarlton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Greeley, CO, USA
    Posts
    3,573
    Mentioned
    15 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Most highlanders, once acclimated to the conditions, should do well in your conditions. the only ones which may have problems are the true ultra-highlanders, which always need only warm days and cold nights. I know N. jacquelineae is not very heat-tolerant, and if days are hot, nights must be cold, and mira is rather high up in elevation as well. However, you conditions should suit most easier highlanders and just about all intermediates there are.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
    Growlist

  3. #3
    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1,824
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by hcarlton View Post
    Most highlanders, once acclimated to the conditions, should do well in your conditions. the only ones which may have problems are the true ultra-highlanders, which always need only warm days and cold nights. I know N. jacquelineae is not very heat-tolerant, and if days are hot, nights must be cold, and mira is rather high up in elevation as well. However, you conditions should suit most easier highlanders and just about all intermediates there are.
    It's weird. My N. boschiana x mira, which should be an intermediate cross, has wilted pitchers (just extremely flimsy) and lids that droop down into the pitcher itself. Another intermediate, my N. vogelii, has wilted pitchers too. However, this is only during the 80s of the day. Once the temperature drops and the humidity rises, they become erect again and the pitchers become less flimsy. I'm just surprised by this because my ultra highlander (N. singlana) has hard pitchers and erect lids... It doesn't make sense. Perhaps they're still settling in, but I have a feeling its temperature because they only act up during the warm days. It would make sense that the intermediates would be happy in the climate.

    Are there any intermediate/highlands Nepenthes that will do especially well in my conditions?

  4. #4
    hcarlton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Greeley, CO, USA
    Posts
    3,573
    Mentioned
    15 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Do remember that humidity drops as temperature rises. The wamrer the air, the more water it holds. So, the warmer the air, the more water you have to add to the air.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
    Growlist

  5. #5
    CreatureTom's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Posts
    425
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Any of the usual hardier species and hybrids like ventricosa and truncata tend to be more heat tolerant. In my small collection Lowii x Boschiana, Veitchii x Platychila and Robcantleyi are the main warmth lovers.

  6. #6
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,875
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Pineapple View Post
    It's weird. My N. boschiana x mira, which should be an intermediate cross, has wilted pitchers (just extremely flimsy) and lids that droop down into the pitcher itself. Another intermediate, my N. vogelii, has wilted pitchers too. However, this is only during the 80s of the day. Once the temperature drops and the humidity rises, they become erect again and the pitchers become less flimsy. I'm just surprised by this because my ultra highlander (N. singlana) has hard pitchers and erect lids... It doesn't make sense. Perhaps they're still settling in, but I have a feeling its temperature because they only act up during the warm days. It would make sense that the intermediates would be happy in the climate.

    Are there any intermediate/highlands Nepenthes that will do especially well in my conditions?
    The bigger question is how much more do I have to do to engineer a more Nepenthes-friendly grow space?, rather than asking which plants will tolerate less-than-optimal conditions.

    30% humidity at 85F is very low for Nepenthes. This is the reason your plants are wilting. If you want a simple solution, just drag a garden hose into the GH and attach a fogging nozzle. You can aim it at knee height and let it go full blast and it will raise humidity significantly AND lower the temp by 5 degrees or more.



    See: http://www.agriculturesolutions.com/...er-Minute.html

    Any garden center worth its salt will have at least one form of this nozzle in their inventory. If one isn't enough, get a "splitter" and attach two. This is a very cheap (and quite effective) way to increase relative humidity.

  7. #7
    Class 5 Nepenthes hoarder lance's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    California, USA
    Posts
    1,298
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    ya... the humidity is the real problem here. I suggest using one of those ^


    In addition to growing plants, I design and build RC planes powered by Tesla batteries. Check out my progress at www.chargedplanes.com

  8. #8
    BigBella's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    SF, CA
    Posts
    2,972
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Provided that there is a significant temperature drop at night, I have never had a heat-related issue with highlanders or ultra-highlanders -- including N. hamata, N. macrophylla, N. jacquelinae, N. edwardsiana, among others; and even though I live in a temperate part of the country, many of my seedlings have regularly experienced late Spring and Summer Tbs in the 29˚C (85˚F) -- especially those under lights and in germination trays.

    The nighttime Tb drops cannot be stressed enough; and some species, such as N. villosa will stop growing with sustained lows above 11˚C (52˚F) . . .
    Last edited by BigBella; 05-08-2012 at 01:11 PM.
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •