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Thread: A guide to Nepenthes villosa cultivation

  1. #9
    villosaholic Heli's Avatar
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    Very nice Travis. Do you know what clone his plant is?

  2. #10
    Class 5 Nepenthes hoarder lance's Avatar
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    Here's what I've heard from an expert on Nepenthes villosa a while back on the CPUK forums. . . His villosa is 17 years old and was grown from seed.


    "Hi Lance

    My N. villosa is still chugging along, although it is now half the plant it was in the photos. Last year it flowererd for the first time (a female) but I think this was out of desperation rather than healthiness! I grew my plant from seed and it is now 17 years old. After flowering the plant went into decline and the main crown died off, to be replaced by two basal rosettes. Over the last few months, two more basal rosettes have appeared as well. Unfortunately, my attempts to pollinate the flower with N. rajah pollen failed.

    I think you will find that the first two years from seed are the slowest, after which it will pick up a bit in growth. The plants are definately easier when they are young, becoming increasingly more difficult as they age. While young, they will not need any special treatment, and the use of a fridge is unnecessary. After about 10 years the plant will be pretty much mature and you might want to consider using a fridge then (temps down to freezing, though not below, are tolerated). The best mix to use is long-fibre sphagnum moss mixed 50/50 with perlite and maybe just a little peat as well. I would use a pond-lily basket for a pot, you know those black plastic mesh pots intended for use in ponds. This will provide easy evaporation from the sides of the pot thus keeping the compost cool. I also found that while young, spraying the foliage sometimes caused unsightly brown spots on the leaves - this was not burning from the sun, as it often happened overnight - I would therefore refrain from spraying the foliage. The fortnightly feeding of hatchling-sized, live crickets (from a reptile shop) did give the plant a boost, otherwise a monthly watering with half-strength Maxicrop fertilizer is also good, but only while the plant is young (5cm across and less) after this size the maxicrop can cause deformities in the forming pitchers.


    I think that this is about it, if I think of anything else I will let you know, and please feel free to ask any more questions."


    In addition to growing plants, I design and build RC planes powered by Tesla batteries. Check out my progress at www.chargedplanes.com

  3. #11
    villosaholic Heli's Avatar
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    David was saying that there are so few large villosa in cultivation that we cant say that to be true just yet. He said that his larger villosas were much more tolerant of humidity and temperature fluctuations than his smaller seedlings.

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