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Thread: Small Lowland Nepenthes?

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    Small Lowland Nepenthes?

    I'm thinking about ordering some seeds, but I don't known what to get. I need lowlands that are easy to grow and don't get too large. A lot of the plants I've looked at would outgrow my 29g aquarium, which wouldn't be good for me since my house doesn't have the best growing conditions. I'm planning on ordering a mature N. bicalcarata. Any ideas? Thanks

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    mcmcnair's Avatar
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    N. bicalcarata is one of the largest lowlanders available. If you want a small lowlander N. bellii is your best bet.
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    East_to_west's Avatar
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    Well, off the bat, Bicals are pretty much the largest and fastest growing nepenthes that you can find. Also, if you haven't grown any before I'd suggest not starting with seed, since it will take years before you have even a small specimen. Order from one of the few great vendors that are online. I can PM you a list if you don't know who they are. There are a few fun ones that will stay small-ish for a while, but nepenthes are vines and will eventually outgrow a 29 gal tank no matter what.
    Edit* I just saw your very beautiful and large ampullaria in the other thread, so I guess you obviously know how big plants can get. As was said above, belii would be your best bet for a small LLer, although even belii will get big over time. Theres one here at the huntington gardens thats easily a 4-5 foot vine with a few rosettes that are over two feet wide. Pretty much, there is no such thing as a nepenthes that will fit inside a terrarium forever. If you wanted to grow highlanders, there are a few plants like aristo and gymniphora that will stay pretty small, but will still grow a long vine like any other plant eventually.
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    Bicalcarata are big eh? Darn. I guess I'll try growing seeds after I go to university and graduate. I want to stick with tropical pitchers that don't need to be overwintered. Oh, and East, I'd appreciate that list. Thanks.

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    East_to_west's Avatar
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    By overwintered do you mean kept inside for winter? Because if you live in canada there is nothing that you can grow outside all year round'.
    Too weird to live, too rare to die.

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    Sorry, I should have clarified. What I mean is putting plants in a cold cellar or something for the winter so they can go into dormancy. I know you have to do that with a lot of fly traps and sundews.

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    I second the recommendation for N. bellii.

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    East_to_west's Avatar
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    Well, nepenthes dont ever go into dormancy. Tropical climates where they grow don't have winters. You'd be much better off growing Highland plants, as most could adapt to even a windowsill or other household climates, whereas lowlanders need to be pampered and kept in a high humidity environment. I grow HLers on my windowsill and in my closet among other places with no problems. As long as you slowly acclimate them to the lower humidity all will be fine.
    Too weird to live, too rare to die.

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