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Thread: LL truncata crosses in highland conditions?

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    LL truncata crosses in highland conditions?

    I just got some greenhouse space at work, so I've started to grow Nepenthes again after taking a break for the better part of the decade. A nursery I've gotten plants from before is offering two crosses I'm interested in growing, N. truncata x merrilliana "Caesar", and N. "thorellii" x (truncata x campanulata), but I'm concerned my conditions are not warm enough (Day: 75f, Night: 55f). I assume hybrids with the highland truncata would do fine for me, but I assume most N.truncata crosses involve to lowland form, since highland N. truncata has only become widespread in cultivation in recent years.

    I've never grown N.truncata before, but I remember hearing that both the highland and lowland forms of N.truncata grow well over a very wide range of conditions. I have seen a number of examples of growers in cool climates growing lowland N. truncata alongside their highlanders (as well as growers in the tropics having success with highland forms). I likely can't get any sort of concrete answer on this, but I was wondering if N.truncata's tolerance for cooler conditions would be likely to be present in it's hybrids.

    I remember a similar situation from back when I first grew Nepenthes. I lived in a climate with very hot summers and high night temps. The only highland nepenthes I had success with were N. ventricosa crosses, which tended to pass on tolerance to lowland conditions in hybrids with other highlanders.

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    mass's Avatar
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    You never once asked a question, so I'll just assume any ol' answer will do..
    I can take pics of my LL truncata, many truncata hybrids, and N. villosa all pitchering side by side if you'd like. Granted, the truncata and ALL of it's hybrids grow at a snail's pace. I'm sure they'd be faster in warmer conditions, but they're thriving, pitchering, and growing. So good enough for me!

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    Thant's the answer to my non-question I was looking for! Sorry I couldn't be more clear. I've seen your picture thread, your grow-space is very impressive. Your temperature conditions are similar to mine, so I should be able to be successful with an intermediate to highland range of plants.

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    Sphagnum Guru Wire Man's Avatar
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    There isn't really any difference between lowland and highland truncata except for where they originate. It'll grow in highland, lowland, or intermediate conditions regardless of what the label says. It's a tough species.

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