User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 24

Thread: Watering too often...

  1. #1
    A leuco by any other name would still be as gluttonous. CorneliusSchrute's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Dexter, MO
    Posts
    534
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Watering too often...

    I have a few Nepenethes around my house (ventricosa, alata, other typicals) and I feel like I have to water them too much due to drying out. Whether it is because I am spoiled on the ease of my proportionally larger and less time consuming Sarracenia collection or something else, I find watering Neps twice a week to be sort of annoying. As of now, most of my Neps are in pure LFSM, that was alive when I potted the plants but is now dead due to my inattentiveness and subsequent drying.

    So my question: what could I repot these plants in so that they require less frequent watering? I am thinking about experimenting with a 2:1 perliteeat combo.

    I know a terrarium would make things easier, but I lack the space for such a construct.
    Corey Bennett

    My cultivated vegetation, carnivorous and otherwise...

    Formerly cbennett4041

  2. #2
    Cthulhu138's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    3,413
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Peat is a poor substrate choice for Nepenthes. Maybe you should consider getting rid of them if you find their care to be "annoying" or too much to handle.

  3. #3
    Aristoloingulamata Dexenthes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Southern Tongass Rainforest, Alaska
    Posts
    3,708
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A denser soil mix with more sand and peat will require less frequent watering and may work for some Nepenthes. But you have to be careful because many species may decline in that substrate and not enjoy it at all. You're better off just remembering to water your plants.
    LOOKING FOR: N. (argentii x bicalcarata) x {[(lingulata x edwardsiana) x (naga x hamata)] x [(klossii x undulatifolia) x (aristolochioides x rajah)]} Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=124586

  4. #4
    A leuco by any other name would still be as gluttonous. CorneliusSchrute's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Dexter, MO
    Posts
    534
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I do enjoy the plants, and don't intentionally negelct them. It is just a symptom of a busy life what with chasing my child around, cleaning, cooking. You know, life stuff. I have considered trading them off when the weather allows for shipment. I will let you folks know first if I go that route.

    To be honest, I just hate to be the one that causes their decline and was wondering if there was a shortcut to allow me to keep better care of them.

    What about the peat do they dislike, I wonder? Is it the lack of oxygen? I thought I had read that at least a few Neps rooted in a somewhat peaty substrate in situ.

    Thanks to both for your knowledgable responses! As always, you are a big help.

  5. #5
    BANNED
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Cascadia Subduction Zone
    Posts
    2,113
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just keep them in water trays and it should be easier to maintain. I realize you don't have space for a terrarium, but this would cut down your watering regime significantly, possibly to where it's only a monthly affair.

  6. #6
    Aristoloingulamata Dexenthes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Southern Tongass Rainforest, Alaska
    Posts
    3,708
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Trays and peaty soil mixes both have the same potential problem for Nepenthes which is that if they are kept too wet for too long they can succumb to root rot and die. I successfully grew N. bicalcarata in a very dense sandy mix with no problems at all. However even I was surprised by how well it did and thought I would encounter root rot issues at some point (though I didn't). It is true that many Nepenthes in the wild actually live in very peaty or sandy soils.
    LOOKING FOR: N. (argentii x bicalcarata) x {[(lingulata x edwardsiana) x (naga x hamata)] x [(klossii x undulatifolia) x (aristolochioides x rajah)]} Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=124586

  7. #7
    Cthulhu138's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    3,413
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Peat will stay far too wet for the liking of most species. It also doesn't allow enough air flow in the substrate and will lead to anaerobic conditions. I recently acquired a Nepenthes that was grown in a mix of peat, perlite and lecca and there were literally no roots on the plant. There are seldom shortcuts you can take without adversely affecting the plants. Their cultivation is all about you as the grower conforming your conditions to their liking, not trying to force the plants to accept sub standard conditions that are easier for you to deal with. It is probably a better option that you just stick to plants that you are more willing and able to care for properly.

  8. #8
    A leuco by any other name would still be as gluttonous. CorneliusSchrute's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Dexter, MO
    Posts
    534
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Interesting and quick responses again, folks. Thanks!

    I had considered the water tray option, but heard it had ill-effects as Dex suggests. Still might try it though. I had some bagged and rooted cuttings I could play with.

    I think of an additonally question. I have never had my Nep pots dry completely. Instead, I usually let the top bit of sphag dry before watering. Will this take a toll eventually? It seems to really have had no ill-effects yet. I just worry about it.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •