User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 17 to 23 of 23

Thread: Nepenthes leaf curling? I don't think it's water...or is it?

  1. #17
    PsychoSarah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    667
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Cthulhu138 View Post
    Water on leaves will cause spotting and rotting, not the wilting and curling we're seeing here.
    True, but over watering might. I can't imagine a plant would be fine for 2 months and then suddenly express damage from an insect pest.
    Last edited by PsychoSarah; 05-13-2014 at 04:24 PM.
    Come to me flies and crawling bugs. This plant wants to give you great big hugs
    Aren't I pretty, don't I smell good? I'd come to you if I could
    But I can't so you must come to me, I'm sure we will get along splendidly

  2. #18
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,875
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If the water-on-the-foliage myth were true, my Nepenthes would all be dead by now, and yet somehow they persist in apparent good health. Perhaps three years isn't long enough for the problem to take effect.....

  3. #19
    theplantman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Athens, GA
    Posts
    973
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Water on the foliage of a plant does not in itself cause anything. All plant leaves have thick, waxy cuticles to protect them. Nepenthes, which evolved in rainforest conditions, are especially suited to shed frequent overhead watering. To get a better sense of different CP habitats and help me with growing, I monitor their weather. I set them as favorite places on weather.com. One location is Kuching, Malaysia (which is in Borneo) and I've been checking on it for almost a year. It rains at least every other day and most of the time, daily.

    What water can do on foliage, especially in the stagnant/dark conditions of an indoor or terrarium environment, is provide great conditions for pathogens to spawn. Mildews, rusts, and a variety of other bacteria and fungi can inoculate and thrive on constantly wet spots. The most important part in avoiding foliar disease is how fast the leaf dries after being wet. Many rainforest natives like Philodendrons have "drip tips" on the leaves, which immediate shed any wetness. Plants from extremely wet areas, like Salvinia, Azolla, Nymphaea, Colocasia, Maidenhair fern, and Columbines have very tiny hairs on their leaves which render them hydrophobic. Pretty cool--it's called the Lotus Effect: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHcd_4ftsNY

  4. #20
    Maiden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    1,911
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by theplantman View Post
    Water on the foliage of a plant does not in itself cause anything. All plant leaves have thick, waxy cuticles to protect them. Nepenthes, which evolved in rainforest conditions, are especially suited to shed frequent overhead watering. To get a better sense of different CP habitats and help me with growing, I monitor their weather. I set them as favorite places on weather.com. One location is Kuching, Malaysia (which is in Borneo) and I've been checking on it for almost a year. It rains at least every other day and most of the time, daily.

    What water can do on foliage, especially in the stagnant/dark conditions of an indoor or terrarium environment, is provide great conditions for pathogens to spawn. Mildews, rusts, and a variety of other bacteria and fungi can inoculate and thrive on constantly wet spots. The most important part in avoiding foliar disease is how fast the leaf dries after being wet. Many rainforest natives like Philodendrons have "drip tips" on the leaves, which immediate shed any wetness. Plants from extremely wet areas, like Salvinia, Azolla, Nymphaea, Colocasia, Maidenhair fern, and Columbines have very tiny hairs on their leaves which render them hydrophobic. Pretty cool--it's called the Lotus Effect: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHcd_4ftsNY
    Great video. Thx for sharing
    Last edited by Maiden; 05-13-2014 at 07:27 PM.

  5. #21
    Nanthawat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    49
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    the water on my plants dries within 30 minutes to an hour. There's a fan that turns on every other 1/2 hour for 1/2 hour.

  6. #22
    PsychoSarah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    667
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Nanthawat View Post
    the water on my plants dries within 30 minutes to an hour. There's a fan that turns on every other 1/2 hour for 1/2 hour.
    How close is the plant to the fan and how strong does it blow? Sure, nepenthes don't mind breezes by any means, but too strong a wind for just about any plant can stunt their growth. It's one of the reasons why the higher up a mountain one goes, the less tall the vegetation steadily becomes, the wind is stronger higher up. I don't think it would cause the curling, but who knows?
    Come to me flies and crawling bugs. This plant wants to give you great big hugs
    Aren't I pretty, don't I smell good? I'd come to you if I could
    But I can't so you must come to me, I'm sure we will get along splendidly

  7. #23
    Nanthawat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    49
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It's about five feet away but it's barely strong enough to move paper but strong enough for mold to not set

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •