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Thread: Nepenthes leaf curling? I don't think it's water...or is it?

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    Nanthawat's Avatar
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    Nepenthes leaf curling? I don't think it's water...or is it?

    This N. Thorelii x Aristolochioides just started giving me issues a week ago, the leaves are starting to curl and the lower leaves are turning orange (I'm assuming that's just old leaves dying off.) The leaves are still stiff except for the yellow/orange ones and I don't see any unusual spots anywhere.
    I've had this plant for about two months now so it should have gotten over it's transitional stress (especially since it produced its pitchers here.)
    What do you guys think?








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    PsychoSarah's Avatar
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    What is with all the moisture on the leaves?
    Come to me flies and crawling bugs. This plant wants to give you great big hugs
    Aren't I pretty, don't I smell good? I'd come to you if I could
    But I can't so you must come to me, I'm sure we will get along splendidly

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    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    Looks like you might have root rot going on there. Are your plants sitting in water ?

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    corky's Avatar
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    thats what i thought,either looks like too much or too little water,if the roots have rotted it will still look water starved,

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    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    This hybrid will not tolerate sitting in water (IE: with a dish under it) -- you will rot the roots off it.

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    theplantman's Avatar
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    How hot is the curled leaf getting? I don't do any growing under artificial lighting so I don't know how close is too close, but if it isn't root rot (I suspect this also) it could be heat scorch. The yellowing on the lower leaves seems like a sign that something is wrong--how fast did they turn yellow? If slow (1-2 weeks) it's probably hungry, if quick (3-5 days or less) then rot is likely.

    We need to know more about your potting mix and watering regime to say more. You can physically inspect for root rot if you are careful in how you unpot the plant.

    Here's a snippet of something I wrote on another forum about the way I diagnose potential rot problems, some of which may apply here:
    So. When Nepenthes have "too much water," you are experiencing one of two things:
    (1) Waterlogged media and lack of air space. You can detect this by unpotting the plant and smelling the soil. Without air, methane gas builds up in the soil from anaerbic processes. It smells bad. If it smells bad, you've solved your issue. The roots will also be mushy, brown, and there will be no color difference on the root tip. Healthy roots are hard to distinguish on Neps even in good conditions because there's very little color difference between the root and its tip. You need to repot into airy, fresh media. The plant is wilting because its roots have suffocated. They die without access to air. Without roots, you get the exact same wilting as if the plant was dying of dehydration. The degree of wilting corresponds to how much of the root system was suffocated to death.
    (2) You have a pathogen. Typically symptom (1) leads to this because the plant is stressed, which makes it easier to get sick. Pythium, phytophthora, and a myriad of other fungi and watermolds infest soil that is overly wet. They consume your plant's roots and are nasty. They're hard to treat without chemicals and I usually advocate throwing out the entire plant. They spread easily from splashing of water and soil, or pruning tools. Sometimes you can see evidence (ex. phytophthora has a distinctive smell and you can see pythium on the soil surface). Since pathogens are eating your roots, you will also get wilting. The degree of wilting corresponds to the size of your infection and the percentage of the roots that are still healthy and transporting water normally.

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    Nanthawat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PsychoSarah View Post
    What is with all the moisture on the leaves?
    I water them with a spray bottle so water splashes everywhere

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    Nanthawat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    This hybrid will not tolerate sitting in water (IE: with a dish under it) -- you will rot the roots off it.
    The dishes don't have water in them unless I overwater, but I pour water out of the dishes. They are sitting on a table so I don't want the water to pour spill out.

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