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Thread: Nepenthes spathulata x hamata

  1. #9
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    I have a fully engineered highland greenhouse; good old wood-and-glass construction, and I am situated in the Pacific Northwest, where summer nights always cool off to 55F or cooler, making greenhouse climate regulation for Nepenthes a relatively easy task.

    And yes, its perfectly reasonable for a badly damaged plant to take a full year to build up to a plant of that size. When I saw that photo, I thought to myself what a great job you did bringing it back to health. I cannot offer you suggestions on watering, since it really comes down to your climate conditions and the density of the potting mix, etc. My soil mix is very light and open and I can water daily if I choose and there would still be plenty of air spaces in the mix. Dense, slow-draining soils will require much more careful monitoring of soil saturation. You have to figure out what works for your conditions and your soil mix. Unless you are letting the soil dry out between waterings, then more watering isn't going to speed up growth. The only thing I have found to increase rate of growth is the return of longer, brighter spring days and daytime highs above 80F* coupled with nights around 52F.

    *but not exceeding 85F if at all avoidable.

  2. #10
    jurow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    The plant has been grown in bright light and is paler than how it would appear under lights. The reddish tint is also normal for this hybrid when grown in strong light.
    The grower is a well-known California nurseryman and he grows healthy plants without exception. Whoever buys it will undoubtedly receive a healthy plant.

    This is an excellent hybrid that for some reason doesn't get nearly the attention as most other hamata hybrids. It's one of my favorites.
    Thanks for the kind words Paul. This is my plant, and Paul is correct. It is growing under pretty intense sunlight, which tends to lead to compact, lightly-colored leaves. I occasionally move some plants indoors under lights for weather reasons, and their next leaf typically emerges as larger and dark green. As the listing says, I've been growing the plant for quite a while, and it's happily producing colorful pitchers all year.

    I also agree that this hybrid does not receive nearly enough credit. I recall that it was posted on BE's availability list for a shockingly long time compared to the other N. hamata hybrids, but that could also be due to how prolific their female N. spathulata tends to be.

  3. #11
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    Josh,
    I think it has something to do with the general lack of respect spathulata hybrids get, in general. I don't understand it myself, as many of them are spectacular plants - the species brings a lot of excellent traits to their progeny.
    Last edited by Whimgrinder; 05-21-2014 at 09:06 AM.

  4. #12
    mass's Avatar
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    I never took interest in any of the new hamata hybrids, until I saw the upcoming N. robcantleyi x hamata. Now there's a cross I'm excited to get my hands on!

  5. #13
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    In my experience, N. robcantleyi is a weak breeder and often the best traits of both parents are diluted in hybrids made with it. I've given away all of my robcantleyi hybrids: there wasn't a keeper in the bunch. Just my personal opinion, of course.

  6. #14
    jurow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    In my experience, N. robcantleyi is a weak breeder and often the best traits of both parents are diluted in hybrids made with it. I've given away all of my robcantleyi hybrids: there wasn't a keeper in the bunch. Just my personal opinion, of course.
    I also have yet to see an especially stunning N. robcantelyi hybrid, but all of the ones I've seen have still been rather immature. That being said, I do have a whole bunch of the N. robcantleyi x hamata crosses coming in w/ high hopes.

  7. #15
    jurow's Avatar
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    Whoops. Forgot about this guy:



    N. densiflora x robcantleyi

  8. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jurow View Post
    Whoops. Forgot about this guy:



    N. densiflora x robcantleyi
    That is the first robcantleyi hybrid that I have found the least bit compelling.

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