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Thread: The tiny ones

  1. #9
    PsychoSarah's Avatar
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    And vines can be trimmed. When I say vining frequently would be an issue, I mean I don't want to trim them once a month or something nuts to keep the plant from being taller than me. I don't want them to take over my dorm like some cheesy plant based horror movie. I can live with some vines, I even have some poles for vines should I need them. I just need plants that won't fear the shears. Ooh, I like that hybrid, it has just the look I want without the pain of imitating super bad temp drops. Know where I could get one?
    Last edited by PsychoSarah; 05-23-2014 at 10:17 PM.
    Come to me flies and crawling bugs. This plant wants to give you great big hugs
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  2. #10
    hcarlton's Avatar
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    No Nepenthes is going to produce vines needing a prune within a month's time. I have ventricosas that I have cut back numerous times, turning them into bushes, and it take a year, but eventually even they get back to having 3-5 foot plus vines. The species that don't vine are difficult highlanders in most cases, or truncata, but that one gets wide, well over 4 feet across.
    If you want something small-ish that shouldn't have issues with cutting back vines, ventricosa is an option, as is glabrata and similar plants.
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  3. #11
    PsychoSarah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hcarlton View Post
    No Nepenthes is going to produce vines needing a prune within a month's time. I have ventricosas that I have cut back numerous times, turning them into bushes, and it take a year, but eventually even they get back to having 3-5 foot plus vines. The species that don't vine are difficult highlanders in most cases, or truncata, but that one gets wide, well over 4 feet across.
    If you want something small-ish that shouldn't have issues with cutting back vines, ventricosa is an option, as is glabrata and similar plants.
    Now I am confused, are the ones in my original list fine then so long as I frequently trim (I guess that will be ok, more propagation opportunities)? Or will the plants suffer from too much trimming and they have to be allowed to get big?
    Come to me flies and crawling bugs. This plant wants to give you great big hugs
    Aren't I pretty, don't I smell good? I'd come to you if I could
    But I can't so you must come to me, I'm sure we will get along splendidly

  4. #12
    Red Lowii's Avatar
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    If you're tight on space and want something small and easy to maintain, either Highlander x Lowlander hybrids or intermediate species are the way to go.
    Here's a few suggestions that are relatively compact and pitcher readily:

    As Paul mentioned already, N. Bellii x aristo and i'll add two more vent x aristo, spectabilis x aristo. These 3 are quite forgiving and easy to maintain/pitcher.

    Species wise: vogelii, maxima var minor, some forms of spectabilis can grow quite compact, burkei is slower than ventricosa and woent need to be cut back. Veitchii is another relatively slow one and can adapt and be tolerant of poor conditions.

  5. #13
    RL7836's Avatar
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    Although you mention it in a few of the descriptions in your original post, I think you may be underestimating the difficulty in growing many of your target species. You may also be overestimating the problematic nature of vining. If you get plants that will adapt to dorm conditions - grow them on a windowsill & let them vine around the window. When they get too long, chop, root & use the newly-created plant as trade fodder - especially if it's something desirable -- your 'problem' becomes an asset.

    I'm not familiar with the hybrids previously mentioned and I would pass on veitchii as they are monsters & the stem is thick, not receptive to being 'trained'. A small form of N. maxima may work well - I've grown a large form on my windowsill & it handled the summer heat & winter lack of humidity w/o issues.
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    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RL7836 View Post
    Although you mention it in a few of the descriptions in your original post, I think you may be underestimating the difficulty in growing many of your target species. You may also be overestimating the problematic nature of vining.
    +1

  7. #15
    PsychoSarah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RL7836 View Post
    Although you mention it in a few of the descriptions in your original post, I think you may be underestimating the difficulty in growing many of your target species. You may also be overestimating the problematic nature of vining. If you get plants that will adapt to dorm conditions - grow them on a windowsill & let them vine around the window. When they get too long, chop, root & use the newly-created plant as trade fodder - especially if it's something desirable -- your 'problem' becomes an asset.

    I'm not familiar with the hybrids previously mentioned and I would pass on veitchii as they are monsters & the stem is thick, not receptive to being 'trained'. A small form of N. maxima may work well - I've grown a large form on my windowsill & it handled the summer heat & winter lack of humidity w/o issues.
    I have a humidifier now so lack of humidity is no longer an issue. I was concerned about vines because I wasn't sure if plants needed to be allowed to vine to remain in good health.
    Come to me flies and crawling bugs. This plant wants to give you great big hugs
    Aren't I pretty, don't I smell good? I'd come to you if I could
    But I can't so you must come to me, I'm sure we will get along splendidly

  8. #16
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PsychoSarah View Post
    I have a humidifier now so lack of humidity is no longer an issue. I was concerned about vines because I wasn't sure if plants needed to be allowed to vine to remain in good health.
    What is the daytime relative humidity in the space now?

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