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Thread: The tiny ones

  1. #1
    PsychoSarah's Avatar
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    The tiny ones

    So, thanks to my limited space for growing things, but my love of nepenthes anyways, I feel sometimes the smaller varieties get ignored in favor of the giant ones, but many of them have pretty traps too. So I have made it my mission that every year I am going to purchase 1 tiny nepenthes species to add to my collection. As it happens I don't currently this year have a tiny species (ventricosa might be on the smaller side, but it isn't truly small, and my other one is a hybrid). Of course, should I fail to keep a purchase alive I am not going to keep on buying more, not without getting better at growing them first or planning on combating whatever unexpected challenge lead to the death of the new plant.

    So, in a month or so I am going to pick one and order it, but I am having trouble choosing which one to get, they are all so great

    So here are the candidates (I have found various suppliers for all of them, so I know they are available)

    Nepenthes mikei (pros, great pitchers, reasonably priced, not everyone has one though. Cons, highlander, uncertain difficulty of growth, might not pitcher black in the conditions I can give it)

    Nepenthes bellii (pros, reasonably priced, lowlander. Cons, frankly, not the greatest pitchers in my opinion, likes to vine)

    Nepenthes glabrata (pros, very small, very pretty pitchers. Cons, I have a hybrid with it as a parent, not the easiest to grow, highlander)

    Nepenthes talangensis (pros, really great pitchers, very small. Cons, this is the second parent to the hybrid mentioned before, I have heard it is hard to get this one to pitcher, highlander)

    Nepenthes adanata (pros, intermediate grower, somewhat rare, found one for a great price. Cons, can get bigger than some of the others on the list, pitchers are meh)


    So I hope one day to have all of these, but I want to limit myself so I don't get overwhelmed with a bunch of new plants without getting more experience. But anyways, I am having trouble picking, so can you guys give me some help? I can imitate lowlander conditions far easier than highland ones, I love dark and colorful pitchers (I dislike green being in pitchers), the smaller the mature plant the better, and vining is a negative if the mature plant ends up being mostly vine. Growth speed isn't relevant to me, while I suppose I would like having a bunch of pitchers immediately, I have the patience to wait. How easy they are to grow is a factor though, I would rather have an easy one than a hard one with my experience.

    So what do you guys think I should get?
    Come to me flies and crawling bugs. This plant wants to give you great big hugs
    Aren't I pretty, don't I smell good? I'd come to you if I could
    But I can't so you must come to me, I'm sure we will get along splendidly

  2. #2
    PsychoSarah's Avatar
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    More than 70 views, and not one person gives advice
    Come to me flies and crawling bugs. This plant wants to give you great big hugs
    Aren't I pretty, don't I smell good? I'd come to you if I could
    But I can't so you must come to me, I'm sure we will get along splendidly

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    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    Two years from acquiring my N. mikei (it was a 4" diameter infant), the plant now has vines over 7 feet long, winding around the roof of my greenhouse. N. glabrata is the same age and has canes 5 feet long and growing fast. Nepenthes grow into vines -- its what they do! And N. talangensis is one of the fussiest species - it will likely never pitcher sitting in a windowsill.
    Last edited by Whimgrinder; 05-23-2014 at 07:53 PM.

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    Well, Nepenthes ampullaria has pretty small pitchers and it is a lowlander.

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    Iwest's Avatar
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    Yeah, I lost my glabrata to mealybugs a couple years ago but it vined quick! It was one of my tallest neps before long. Small pitchers but NOT a small plant.

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    PsychoSarah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iwest View Post
    Yeah, I lost my glabrata to mealybugs a couple years ago but it vined quick! It was one of my tallest neps before long. Small pitchers but NOT a small plant.
    Ugh, I hate that when looking up small species! They always refer to pitcher size and not overall plant size. But I would have never imagined that species would get so big. Crap, crossing fingers hoping my hybrid doesn't vine like that.
    Come to me flies and crawling bugs. This plant wants to give you great big hugs
    Aren't I pretty, don't I smell good? I'd come to you if I could
    But I can't so you must come to me, I'm sure we will get along splendidly

  7. #7
    PsychoSarah's Avatar
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    So what species would you guys recommend if I want to keep things small? Ones which wouldn't suffer if I frequently pruned them or at least wouldn't vine a whole lot.
    Come to me flies and crawling bugs. This plant wants to give you great big hugs
    Aren't I pretty, don't I smell good? I'd come to you if I could
    But I can't so you must come to me, I'm sure we will get along splendidly

  8. #8
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    You might consider a hybrid between highland and lowland types, so you have the best chances of adapting it to a range of temps. N. bellii X aristolochioides comes to mind. Both are smallish species, though this hybrid WILL vine after one or two years. It's what these plants do.
    Last edited by Whimgrinder; 05-23-2014 at 10:03 PM.

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