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Thread: Highlander Habitat Help

  1. #17
    PsychoSarah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bio View Post
    Just as a reminder, they are easy when given their required temperature and humidity. These are easy in good solid highland conditions, which is 70s to low 80s in the day, and 50s to low 60s at night, with high humidity, especially at night.
    I have humidity taken care of completely, been practicing different methods of cooling, seems to be working out
    Come to me flies and crawling bugs. This plant wants to give you great big hugs
    Aren't I pretty, don't I smell good? I'd come to you if I could
    But I can't so you must come to me, I'm sure we will get along splendidly

  2. #18
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    Yes, they will both grow well under the same conditions.

  3. #19
    Carnivorous plant enthusiast vraev's Avatar
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    I found inermis to be very easygoing. I have no experience with Edwardsiana but I have grown two hamata clones before and they were a spider mite magnet. But as long as you give all of these good night temps and relatively cool day time temps, they should do great.

  4. #20
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bio View Post
    Just as a reminder, they are easy when given their required temperature and humidity. These are easy in good solid highland conditions, which is 70s to low 80s in the day, and 50s to low 60s at night, with high humidity, especially at night.
    I cannot overemphasize the importance of this statement. Precise control over environmental conditions in a consistent manner is key. Not just hitting the mark three days out of five and getting somewhat close the rest of the time. Most newcomers to Nepenthes don't realize how crucial it is to provide consistent climate conditions. Some species can take a year or more to truly acclimate to a new growing environment, and they can't do it if the climate isn't consistently within parameters. Just sayin'.
    Last edited by Whimgrinder; 06-30-2014 at 07:34 AM.

  5. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    I cannot overemphasize the importance of this statement. Precise control over environmental conditions in a consistent manner is key. Not just hitting the mark three days out of five and getting somewhat close the rest of the time. Most newcomers to Nepenthes don't realize how crucial it is to provide consistent climate conditions. Some species can take a year or more to truly acclimate to a new growing environment, and they can't do it if the climate isn't consistently within parameters. Just sayin'.
    Yup. What flucuating conditions generate is constant stress. Best way to kill any plant.

  6. #22
    PsychoSarah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    I cannot overemphasize the importance of this statement. Precise control over environmental conditions in a consistent manner is key. Not just hitting the mark three days out of five and getting somewhat close the rest of the time. Most newcomers to Nepenthes don't realize how crucial it is to provide consistent climate conditions. Some species can take a year or more to truly acclimate to a new growing environment, and they can't do it if the climate isn't consistently within parameters. Just sayin'.
    Makes me wish there were terrariums which had climate controls which were small.
    Come to me flies and crawling bugs. This plant wants to give you great big hugs
    Aren't I pretty, don't I smell good? I'd come to you if I could
    But I can't so you must come to me, I'm sure we will get along splendidly

  7. #23
    I Am the Terror Of the Night! NemJones's Avatar
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    What would you guys recommend for climate control? Ive been looking around but cant find a model that looks optimal. Preferably one that would do well with cooling.
    (Is there an alternative method I could use for the temperature drops like frozen bottles of water or frozen icecube trays?)

  8. #24
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    The oft-cited ice cube technique is the stuff of hort mythology; frequently discussed, sometimes attempted and inevitably abandoned as far too much work for unreliable results.

    There is fogging/cooling hardware for reptile terraria, but as I have no personal experience with this technology*, I will let someone else suggest specific hardware. I know it exists, and I suspect quality hardware is somewhat costly.

    *I have a full-sized highland greenhouse that uses a combination of fogger cooling, a small air conditioner, and shadecloth to manage temperature/humidity. A very different scenario than dealing with a small glass tank.

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