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Thread: N. Red Hairy Hamata

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    N. Red Hairy Hamata

    Hello, im wondering what people have to say about the growing conditions of the Hairy Red Hamata. I do know its a highlander but does it do better as an ultrahighlander or no? Ive also seen where people even grow them on their windowsills so i was wondering from people who have grown them, what the best results came from. Thank you for at least taking the time to read this.

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    I Am the Terror Of the Night! NemJones's Avatar
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    Last edited by NemJones; 11-17-2014 at 01:46 PM.

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    w03's Avatar
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    If I recall correctly, red hairy hamata is quite a bit pickier and slower than normal hamata, so the generalizations from normal hamata probably don't apply very well.
    "Potential has a shelf life." -Margaret Atwood
    My meager growlist

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    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by w03 View Post
    If I recall correctly, red hairy hamata is quite a bit pickier and slower than normal hamata, so the generalizations from normal hamata probably don't apply very well.
    This is a distinct species and cannot be compared to N. hamata. Generalizations about its cultivation requirements are to be viewed as very general only and not particularly useful.

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    Plant Whisperer Bio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    This is a distinct species and cannot be compared to N. hamata. Generalizations about its cultivation requirements are to be viewed as very general only and not particularly useful.
    Quote Originally Posted by w03 View Post
    If I recall correctly, red hairy hamata is quite a bit pickier and slower than normal hamata, so the generalizations from normal hamata probably don't apply very well.
    Exactly. The "Red Hairy hamata" is more of an ultrahighlander than the true N. hamata. Their culture is about as similar as N. truncata and N. veitchii. It's like comparing apples to oranges.

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    mksmith's Avatar
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    Nepenthes hamata is easy to grow in general and much easier in comparison to RHH. Yes, RHH does better as an 'ultra-highlander' for temperature so you are looking at day temps 65-75 and nights 45-55 which can be difficult to maintain year-around. RHH is also much slower than n. hamata and very sensitive to change, i.e. changes with regards to distance to light source, humidity fluctuation, drying out of soil, etc. I don't think you could grow RHH on an windowsill successfully, and is not a plant that should be tackled unless you have years of highland Nepenthes experience growing. It needs stability, I remember having issues when I moved 2-3 years ago, the plant was not happy even though the setup was identical.
    Last edited by mksmith; 11-17-2014 at 08:12 AM.

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    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    I grow this plant and it is by far the most difficult Nepenthes I've ever grown. It would be virtually impossible to grow this species on a windowsill unless you live atop a mountain somewhere in a tropical cloud forest. It's slow, picky and extremely sensitive to humidy, temperature and light levels, at least while young. I would not recommend this species (if you can even find one) to anyone but the most expert of growers and even then, many of them fail to keep this species alive for very long. 100% perfect UHL conditions are needed for this plant. Paul would probably even find this plant frustrating to keep happy.

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    villosaholic Heli's Avatar
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    Yeah not only is it incredibly hard to grow, its also very hard to find and if you do find it, very expensive. So you might as well burn 300 dollars because that would probably be more entertaining than trying to grow one of BE's red hairy hamata . I do not have the species yet so I cannot say for sure but I have a feeling that the plants that have been released by BE are generally very weak specimens. Most people fail with their plants but a few growers have had success getting them to vine in seemingly typical highland conditions. In my opinion I think you should wait until it becomes a more commonplace species, if you already have nepenthes experience you might want to try the typical hamata first and then maybe a villosa before even considering RHH.

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