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Thread: How important is day time or maximum temperature

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    ps3isawesome's Avatar
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    How important is day time or maximum temperature

    Right now, I am unable to get my terrarium's night time temperature to drop. My max is 77 and low is 66. I can def get it below 60 if I just leave them in the garage. However, in that case the day time temperature will prob decrease to low 70's which would lover my max temperature. Is that okay for a Highland Nepenthes Terrarium?

    Thanks!!

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    Oregoncp's Avatar
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    To have your highland nepenthes really flourish, you are going to want nights lower than 66.
    Heating is always easier than cooling when it comes to a contained system like a terrarium. Something as cheap as a aquarium heaters in a couple inches of water in the bottom of the tank is plenty to get the temps up. specially if you do any sort of insulation on the tank. My lowland tank has the foil covered bubble wrap around it. I find it really helps hold the heat in. Depending on how cold your garage actually is, you might find that just your lighting and some insulation will be enough to get the temps up.

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    I Am the Terror Of the Night! NemJones's Avatar
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    It isnt a good idea to let highland nepenthes go very long without nightly cooling.
    The best and most recommended option is to used a converted fridge, or swamp cooler.
    If everything else has failed or there is no other option, freezing bottles of ice works well,
    especially in winter.

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    PsychoSarah's Avatar
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    You should get that down to at least 55 or so degrees at night if you can. Highlanders don't need any higher than 70 degree days, in fact, from what I have gathered that is essentially the preferred daytime temperature.
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    Plant Whisperer Bio's Avatar
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    It must not get any higher than 59-60 at night, with 45-55 being ideal for most HL-UHL species for long term health. Daytime temps should be 65-75 for best growth.

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    I don't know, I grew several highland species during the summer in temperatures ranging from 64 - 84 with no problems. You have to feed the plants if you're going to do this, though.

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    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mato View Post
    I don't know, I grew several highland species during the summer in temperatures ranging from 64 - 84 with no problems. You have to feed the plants if you're going to do this, though.
    It depends which species, and for how long a period they are exposed to such temps. Don't expect to grow N. aristolochioides this way and have success!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    It depends which species, and for how long a period they are exposed to such temps. Don't expect to grow N. aristolochioides this way and have success!
    This is true, although those species included rajah, macrophylla, villosa, etc.. Strangely enough, given the reputations of those species, I find that the highland Sumatran species (like what Paul used as an example) are more sensitive to the actual drop at night than other factors. They certainly grew better for me when they were near a window experiencing temperatures in the high 40s.

    Still, if your temperatures hover around 60F at night, you can get by if you regularly feed the plant. You'll essentially be restoring the the carbohydrates that the plant is losing at night from being too warm. Not ideal, but it offsets the issue.

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