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Thread: Shipping in Winter

  1. #1
    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
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    Shipping in Winter

    Is shipping Nepenthes in Winter doable and easy? Here the nights don't get below 30F usually and days are in the 50s and 60s... I know on the east coast is must be very cold.

    I have a shipping method for Nepenthes that has never failed me, but I have never shipping anything in winter before. I usually just bag the plant up in big ziplock bags, put some newspaper in the box, place the plant in and wrap the crap out of it with newspapers. In Winter it might get too cold though... Maybe?

    If the package always stays in a warehouse and in a truck, it's gonna be no less than 50F at all time I'd say, am I wrong?

    Do I need heat packs? What kind? Where do I get them?

    TIA

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    I've never bothered using heat backs unless the destination was near or below freezing. And typically if this is the case, you ship with the mutual understanding that it's on the buyer if the plant experiences cold damage. With that said, go to eBay and search for uniheat heat packs, preferably 72 hours.

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    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mato View Post
    I've never bothered using heat backs unless the destination was near or below freezing. And typically if this is the case, you ship with the mutual understanding that it's on the buyer if the plant experiences cold damage. With that said, go to eBay and search for uniheat heat packs, preferably 72 hours.
    So it's likely the plant will always be in a warehouse or truck or plane that is above 50F?

    And should I put anything in the description stating that cold damage won't be covered? It's hard to find a nice way of putting that lol...

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    You definitely can't guarantee that the plant will be protected from the elements. So to your first question, I'd say definitely not.

    I always tell people (usually in the description first, but in messages later) that I'll ship when I feel it's safest for the plant, unless they're willing to risk the weather on their end. If they're prepared to take that risk, you just let them know that you'll provide a heat pack at an extra cost but cannot be responsible for frost damage or anything else that may occur during shipment.
    Last edited by mato; 11-24-2014 at 03:04 PM.

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    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    Any of the merchants that even dared to ship live plants to me between December and March always, ALWAYS shipped with heat packs. And although USPS packages generally get care to avoid exposure to extremes of hot and cold, there is no guarantee a package won't be exposed to freezing temps at some point. Since I've been a member on TF, there have been quite a few reports of packages shipped in the winter and arriving frost damaged. It is inherently risky.
    Last edited by Whimgrinder; 11-24-2014 at 03:10 PM.

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    You know when your luggage is taken off the plane and carted around to your connecting flight? You know how they sometimes sit out there during your layover? That is what happens with packages too.

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    ps3isawesome's Avatar
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    you haven't had much for sale at all lately, are you gonna put out more stuff?

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    NatchGreyes's Avatar
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    Heat Packs are the way to go! I've had...way more plants than I can count shipped to and from me in winter in New Hampshire (average outside temp 14 degrees F!). My recommendation is two-fold -

    1: If shipping to a cold location, write "keep out of cold" on the box. That'll usually tell the mail person that, if someone isn't home, take it to the post office and hold it there. Sure, it's a pain for the person receiving to pick it up, but better than keeping it outside. (If receiving from another location, you can always leave a note for the mailman to hold your packages at the post office).

    2: The heat pack is NOT for your plant to sit outside in the cold. It is for the time during which USPS has possession of your plant. Those moments when it's being loaded and unloaded from the truck. In my experience, a 72 hour heat pack will keep a package warm for about an hour outside in 14 degree weather, after being shipped over the course of a couple days.

    I haven't had any problems with any kind of plant (lowland, highland, heli, Nep, drosera, ping, etc.). However, the plants may get a little more roughed up based on the weight of the pack, so be careful it doesn't slide around.

    Of course, what I've said is just my experience. I don't have the crazy temps of the midwest, so I don't know about them. Anywhere on the coasts should be fine. I can't tell you about the interior.

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