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Thread: Neps as epiphytes?

  1. #17
    SerMuncherIV's Avatar
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    I've read that other growers have success with using a soil mix with 10% limestone chunks by volume, 5% if the powdered form is used, you just need to get the calcium carbonate into the soil somehow. Apparently this species had taken to liking conditions one would expect of a tropical butterwort - it's certainly the only Nepenthes I've heard of that likes a higher soil pH than lower.
    Last edited by SerMuncherIV; 04-14-2015 at 04:01 PM.

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    Where does one buy small quantities of limestone? My campanulata is suffering too.

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    Most gravel roads consist of limestone. If you look and can see small fossils in the rocks and they cause a white dust on your hands when you pick them up it most definitely is. We have a ton of it here in Indiana

  4. #20
    SerMuncherIV's Avatar
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    I agree, most gravel dredged up from river beds usually has small bits of limestone or chalk in it, and this amount would likely be suitable for your needs. Be wary of using something sold simply as lime or "industrial/building" lime though, more often than not this is actually quicklime or slacklime, both of which are somewhat caustic and fail to provide the calcium carbonate needed by the plants. Agricultural or garden lime is fine, it's made of pulverized limestone/chalk which are both calcium carbonate based. What peeves me is that it's sold as garden "lime" instead of "limestone" or "chalk", which leads to huge confusion regarding the difference between lime (calcium oxide or calcium hydroxide) and limestone/chalk (calcium carbonate).

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    Do most Nep growers allow their plants to vine up onto things, or are they often cut back? I often see photos of plants that are only a foot in height or smaller. And none ever seem to be growing up anything.
    Last edited by Acro; 04-14-2015 at 05:40 PM.

  6. #22
    SerMuncherIV's Avatar
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    This is a question that really depends upon the particular situation. Most of the time, it's a matter of preference or space. Many people growing in terrariums like to keep their plants shorter and bushier than those growing in greenhouses just to save room. Some people like to grow in hanging baskets and let the vines dangle over the side. Others will stake their plants when they start vining, and I've seen really impressive cultivated specimens of N. veitchii climbing up trees. Some species naturally don't vine very much and subsequently produce few upper pitchers (N. sibuyanensis and N. rajah come to mind). Also, when people want their plants to be mobile so they can bring them to expos and such, it's quite easier to carry around a plant without several feet of vines.
    Last edited by SerMuncherIV; 04-14-2015 at 07:36 PM.

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