User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 9 to 16 of 21

Thread: Is the coffee as fertilizer debate settled?

  1. #9
    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,484
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    I'm hogging it all! :-p
    Aha! It worked! Knew I'd get your secret out of you!
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
    Just know when to keep the verdict to yourself.

  2. #10
    Av8tor1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    4,811
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Maybe some biosymbiotic (is that a word?) benefits as well..... just a thought.
    I've read that some large golf courses spread corn meal on their greens to increase Trichoderma growth.
    Evidently some species go ape when fed a little corn meal.

    but way out of my league now, I'll let you bio major types play
    I got crayons :-)

  3. #11

    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK, USA
    Posts
    120
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've read a little about this topic in the forum, and it is pretty interesting that some people "see" positive effects.

    Here is a study showing that incorporating spent coffee ground has physiological effects on Lettuce. They observed increased carotenoid and chlorophyll concentrations. Biomass generally decreased with more coffee in the soil (the abstract is a bit misleading because increased biomass in 10% coffee treatment is not statistically supported if you read the full text). They interpret that the plants get stressed with addition of coffee, and caused the increased pigment concentrations (which is good for human who eat them).
    http://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/17/2/1535

    Caffeine has been shown to have some phytotoxicicity. Generally, in several plants, root growth gets suppressed with caffeine. I had to read about it because I was going to use caffeine powder to control bush snails.

    https://bibliotecadigital.ipb.pt/bit...g%20Madrid.pdf

    http://link.springer.com/article/10....738-007-0132-4 (abstract only)

    Now, this doesn't mean that it doesn't work for CP. Somethings could be generalized to plants, but others may be specific to each group of plant species. Also, spent ground is different from extracted coffee.
    Last edited by naoki; 07-29-2015 at 12:12 PM.

  4. #12
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,875
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It seems to me that the so-called "debate" is not whether coffee treatments have something to offer or not, but how well they measure up against commercially formulated fertilizers. Does coffee add nutrients to the soil that appear to be beneficial to Nepenthes? Yes, it appears so. Does coffee do a better job than commercially formulated fertilizers? Absolutely not, IMO.

    I did coffee only for a year and saw a reduction in performance of my adult plants. When I resumed fertilizing with a balanced Orchid blend fertilizer (Dyna Gro Orchid), plants looked better, leaves grew larger and pitchers increased in size. I don't bother with coffee anymore.

  5. #13
    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,484
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    It seems to me that the so-called "debate" is not whether coffee treatments have something to offer or not, but how well they measure up against commercially formulated fertilizers. Does coffee add nutrients to the soil that appear to be beneficial to Nepenthes? Yes, it appears so. Does coffee do a better job than commercially formulated fertilizers? Absolutely not, IMO.

    I did coffee only for a year and saw a reduction in performance of my adult plants. When I resumed fertilizing with a balanced Orchid blend fertilizer (Dyna Gro Orchid), plants looked better, leaves grew larger and pitchers increased in size. I don't bother with coffee anymore.
    Caffeine started getting to you?
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
    Just know when to keep the verdict to yourself.

  6. #14
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,875
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by SubRosa View Post
    Caffeine started getting to you?
    LOL
    Let me rephrase that - "I applied coffee-only to my plants for a year, etc. etc" Better?

    PS: How much caffeine is there in Unicorn Horn, anyway??

  7. #15
    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,484
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    LOL
    Let me rephrase that - "I applied coffee-only to my plants for a year, etc. etc" Better?

    PS: How much caffeine is there in Unicorn Horn, anyway??
    Too much. I use the decaf.
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
    Just know when to keep the verdict to yourself.

  8. #16
    theplantman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Athens, GA
    Posts
    973
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BigBella View Post
    There is no "mumbo jumbo" to be had. There are over one thousand active chemical compounds within coffee; and whether plants simply benefit from further acidification of their media; whether more significant chemical reactions occur, it has proven beneficial in my experience. Coffee is particularly high in phenolic compounds -- some twelve percent of dry weight in unroasted beans -- which have a role in breaking down decaying plant material; thereby, freeing up some complex organic nutrients.

    As far as commercial nurseries are concerned, the local one here not only uses and sells compost "teas" but also brings in spent grounds from Starbucks and Peets by the wheelbarrow load, to add to their composts . . .
    Let me set the record straight. I'm not claiming there are absolutely no benefits to coffee-derived media supplements. Perhaps in the short term it does create a "boost" of sorts. While the chemistry is, as you mentioned, complicated, there is a consistently high presence of a chemical (caffeine) which has demonstratably allelopathic properties. Thus, regardless of what other chemicals are in coffee-based additives, at the end of the day they're attached to caffeine, and this is always a downside. Jury's still out if this specifically impacts Nepenthes and other CPs.

    Now, when you compare this to fertilizers, the benefits of coffee derivatives are negligible and probably harmful in the long-term. If a plant is starving, adding almost anything in the world with minimal amounts of N-P-K would improve them. Having a substantial amount of experience with fertilization regimens for a vast diversity of CPs and non-CPs, I'd never choose coffee over fertilizer. Furthermore, most of the nurserymen and horticulturists I know would follow suit, especially if they were tasked to grow plants quickly and at a dependable rate.

    It isn't that coffee doesn't work at all. It's like Paul seconded: it's a lackluster solution to achieve greater, healthier plant growth. And therefore in my opinion, it's an obsolete idea that isn't productive to play with anymore. Let's say a person is early into this hobby and wondering how to improve the health/vigor of their plants as well as expand their horticultural skillset. Assuredly, the payoff is higher if that person spends time experimenting with fertilizers and not coffee.
    Last edited by theplantman; 07-30-2015 at 11:57 AM.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •