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Thread: Black nepenthes

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    takitza's Avatar
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    cyclopse Black nepenthes

    Dear all,

    Please help me identify my nepenthes, which I got a few weeks back. I need to know at least what type is (lowland, intermediate, highland) to be able to grow it properly. Until now I know that I have mine on a east windowsill, where it grows slowly. I gave as a present one also to a friend of mine, and it's standing outside, with all day indirect sun, at around 25-30*C, and it's growing better. (Just for a hint that may help)


    Thanks!

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    SerMuncherIV's Avatar
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    N. x 'Rebecca Soper'. A weedy, common, and easy-to-grow hybrid commonly sold at garden centers and other venues. The cross is N. gracillima x ventricosa, and it grows best as an intermediate, although it'll do well practically anywhere.

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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    The cross is actually ramispina x ventricosa, gracillima is not exactly a common species and its relatives have often been mistakenly ID'ed as such. Past that however the parentage won't affect the growing needs, this is a very easy to grow hybrid.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
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    takitza's Avatar
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    But rebecca soper doesn't have any hairs on the lid, doesn't it? mine does

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    Your Real Mom ErrorEN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by takitza View Post
    But rebecca soper doesn't have any hairs on the lid, doesn't it? mine does
    Hairs on the lid are present on younger plants, iirc.
    How can gravity be so strong if it doesn't even lift?
    >Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/gr...-growlist.html

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    SerMuncherIV's Avatar
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    But rebecca soper doesn't have any hairs on the lid, doesn't it? mine does
    Young pitchers often have hairs on the lid that mature pitchers don't.

    The cross is actually ramispina x ventricosa, gracillima is not exactly a common species and its relatives have often been mistakenly ID'ed as such.
    ICPS lists the parents as gracillima x ventricosa, other sources say it's ramispina x ventricosa. I trust the ICPS more, and apparently they know the breeder (Matthew Soper) and the location of origin, so I use that ID. Of course, if Matthew Soper misidentified his plant and gave the ICPS incorrect information, they could be wrong...

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    villosaholic Heli's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SerMuncherIV View Post
    Young pitchers often have hairs on the lid that mature pitchers don't.



    ICPS lists the parents as gracillima x ventricosa, other sources say it's ramispina x ventricosa. I trust the ICPS more, and apparently they know the breeder (Matthew Soper) and the location of origin, so I use that ID. Of course, if Matthew Soper misidentified his plant and gave the ICPS incorrect information, they could be wrong...
    Its definitely not gracillima x ventricosa. N. gracillima is almost impossible to find in cultivation and actually looks more like N. spectabilis, almost all plants labeled as such are actually N. alba. However, N. "Rebecca Soper" is a hybrid with ramispina and not N. alba nor N. gracillima.

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    SerMuncherIV's Avatar
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    The ICPS actually had the hybrid listed as gracillima or alba x ventricosa (uncertain parentage), but they recently changed it to only gracillima x ventricosa...that being said, if the ID is 100% incorrect, then we should inform them. That should prevent any more annoying games of Blue's Clues - Guess the Nepenthes Hybrid! being played, at least with this plant.
    Last edited by SerMuncherIV; 08-06-2015 at 10:51 AM.

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