User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 9 to 16 of 25

Thread: Next on Springer: "My Nepenthes is a TRANNY!"

  1. #9
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,875
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I just had a friend message me and point out that this may explain how there are both male AND female clones of N. Lady Pauline in cultivation......

  2. #10
    BigBella's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    SF, CA
    Posts
    2,972
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Strangely, my friend's plant, which swapped sex this last year, was seed grown, not tissue cultured . . .
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

  3. #11
    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,484
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    How long can Nepenthes pollen be stored? If it was at all possible I'd have to try and self that thing!
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
    Just know when to keep the verdict to yourself.

  4. #12
    corky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    warwickshire,england
    Posts
    1,344
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by SubRosa View Post
    How long can Nepenthes pollen be stored? If it was at all possible I'd have to try and self that thing!
    Wonder if the resulting seedlings would be any good on the banjo:-) I thought the same might get some weird recessive genes going on, think pollen has been frozen and successfully used after a year
    Last edited by corky; 09-13-2015 at 04:28 AM.

  5. #13
    Axelrod12's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    New Haven, CT
    Posts
    399
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Very interesting, I've heard of this with other plants, never a CP before though.

  6. #14

    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    207
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    How long before nepenthes flower? I'd be interested to see if any of mine do this.

  7. #15
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,875
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BigBella View Post
    Strangely, my friend's plant, which swapped sex this last year, was seed grown, not tissue cultured . . .
    David, I suspect this phenomenon has nothing to do with it being a tissue cultured plant - I expect this is something some individuals can do as part of their natural reproductive process. Just think how easy it would be to miss this phenomenon in wild populations! I mean, there are very, very few plants that anyone tracks and visits repeatedly in situ, and even if they did, odds are they might not notice the sex change when/if it happened. And who knows how rarely it occurs in natural settings.

    Maybe it's entirely induced by cultivation technique? Though I've gone to great effort to emulate the rain forest conditions this genus needs to thrive, undoubtedly there are some aspects of my care that fall outside normal environmental conditions. For example, temperature: this has been an exceptional hot summer in the PNW, with many days exceeding 95F for several hours each afternoon. I can keep temps inside the greenhouse down to about 88F near the peak of the house, but perhaps that exceeds "normal" for several species I grow, and maybe enough hours above 82F (arbitrary figure) triggers a "Jennerization", prompting a normally male plant to produce female scapes! I'm thinking of that as being like the inverse of how many temperate fruit trees require an accumulation of chill-hours in order to flower the following spring. It's a well known fact that stressors in the environment can prompt strange changes in an organisms behavior or appearance, so it's not hard to imagine a similar mechanism at work here.

    Or or maybe some individuals* - once they reach a certain age - can afford the resources to manufacture seeds (an expensive proposition for any plant; they have to have the resources available to make seeds or the plant can die from the effort) and so they can switch gender once they feel able to make seed, which is surely an asset in terms of increasing species survivability. With an average of 7 males to every 3 females in most species found in situ, adding a few more females to the equation - especially healthy, robust adults that can afford to make copious seed - would be a real asset, wouldn't you think? So, David - do you happen to know if your friends hamata was an older, fully established adult plant or not?

    Now, the big questions are: 1) is this plant going to produce viable seed when pollinated? and 2) will it remain female from now on, or is it going to be inclined to switch back to male once it no longer senses the pressure or influence that switched it?

    *There is speculation by a few authors suggesting that polyploids in certain genera can switch sex from male to female if the meristematic growing point reverts to diploid. See: International Carnivorous Plant Society - Nepenthes Phylogeny (That link is a fantastic article by John Brittnacher) Whether this may a mechanism for gender change in Nepenthes is unknown, however. It is worth noting as well, that all Nepenthes species tested have shown to be octoploids, but cytologically behave as diploids! So there is genetic weirdness going on in this genus, and who knows what much of it really means.
    Last edited by Whimgrinder; 09-13-2015 at 07:17 AM. Reason: additional info added.

  8. #16

    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    207
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    *There is speculation by a few authors suggesting that polyploids can switch sex from male to female if the meristematic growing point reverts to diploid.
    I should look into that. I'm doing a project related to polyploidy soon, so I'll make a few polyploids of a plant that I know the sex of, and see if any of them change.

    Also, do Nepenthes have a way of releasing hormones or such into their environment to change the sex of one or more of them similar to how clownfish will?

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •