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Thread: N. sanguinae brown leaves.

  1. #17
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cruzzfish View Post
    I never said I was growing Dionaea and Nepenthes in the same tank. I'm growing Nepenthes and tropical Drosera in the same tank, and Dionaea, Sarracenia, Utricularia, Habaneria, Colopogonand two other species of Drosera in the same room several feet away away.
    That was not made clear in the discussion. Regardless, those conditions are far from ideal for an intermediate species like sanguinea. To avoid problems like the one you've already experienced, you ought to raise the temps in their tank by at least ten degree F.

  2. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by theplantman View Post
    Also gonna throw out there that I feel like cold media/roots and root hair death may be what leads to the cold spots on the leaves. Don't know how feasible this is, but I do it for African Violets: it would help if you had the option to use warm tap water to water your plants. Obviously it will cool to your GH temp over time, but you won't get the cold water shock that can really harm roots.

    As far as the VFTs are concerned, if they awaken and you can reliably keep temps above freezing, nothing bad will happen to them. No reason to sweat bumping the overall temperature. The VFTs in the UGA collection are getting 65-75F nights consistently throughout the winter because they're grouped in with all the lowland tropicals like Neps and orchids. They emerge earlier, but there's no downside to this at all. If anything, by elongating their growing season I find they have better offsetting and seed set.
    I'm 90% the leaves that were affected were touched by snowmelt directly. The past few years have never caused the Nepenthes a problem and none of the other five nepenthes were effected, and as I mentioned earlier there was cold water potentially dripping on it due to a bad decision. The past night was even colder in that room and nothing got worse, so I think this was a one time thing.

  3. #19
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    It appears you've been given information from several growers indicating that your temps are too low for this species, but you've decided you're going to continue doing what you're doing - so, best of luck. :-)

  4. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    It appears you've been given information from several growers indicating that your temps are too low for this species, but you've decided you're going to continue doing what you're doing - so, best of luck. :-)
    I have had the best of luck for the past couple years with it. I don't see why you don't believe me, but if you want pictures of it while it's still alive in a couple months, and then then when it's alive next year, and then the year after, I'd be happy to oblige.

  5. #21
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    My concerns are based solely on 1) what the plant looks like right now, and 2) your growing conditions as you've described them. Thirdly, luck has nothing to do with successes in horticulture, its about skill. One does not acquire skill by wishing for it.
    Why not aim for optimal, instead of settling for minimal? that's what I don't understand.
    Last edited by Whimgrinder; 01-26-2016 at 01:53 PM.

  6. #22
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    Agreeing with Whim here: while your plants are fine now, I've had plants of my own subsist in suboptimal conditions for several years before otherwise inexplicably dying off. If you don't change your conditions for the neps (and tropical Drosera as some of those depending on species don't like habitually cold nights) you may pay for it sooner than you think. 45F is pushing it for most neps other than the ultrahighlanders (even then perhaps only for short periods). The current state from what has been given is almost without any doubt cold damage, most directly from the snowmelt water on it but likely compounded by low temperatures, but without optimal conditions it is also that much harder to get it to recover from damage, and it may be more susceptible to other issues now that it has been hit.
    Also, forgive me for being nitpicky but I've seen it several times now: the nomenclature is N. sanguinea, not sanguinae.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
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  7. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by hcarlton View Post
    Agreeing with Whim here: while your plants are fine now, I've had plants of my own subsist in suboptimal conditions for several years before otherwise inexplicably dying off. If you don't change your conditions for the neps (and tropical Drosera as some of those depending on species don't like habitually cold nights) you may pay for it sooner than you think. 45F is pushing it for most neps other than the ultrahighlanders (even then perhaps only for short periods). The current state from what has been given is almost without any doubt cold damage, most directly from the snowmelt water on it but likely compounded by low temperatures, but without optimal conditions it is also that much harder to get it to recover from damage, and it may be more susceptible to other issues now that it has been hit.
    Also, forgive me for being nitpicky but I've seen it several times now: the nomenclature is N. sanguinea, not sanguinae.
    True that they will decline slowly over the years, but conditions are only cold for a month or so. If they grow in less than optimal conditions for only a couple months, won't this be negated by the other eight or nine months of the year when conditions are normal for it? Even then, the heat from the lights helps some, and every other week or so the temperature in the room goes up to sixty or so. 45 is only the coldest they ever get, and for the most part conditions are much better.

  8. #24
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    If it is your intent to persist in believing nothings wrong with your technique, then our opinions on the matter don't count. In that case, why ask for advice?

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