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Thread: N. sanguinae brown leaves.

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    N. sanguinae brown leaves.

    I've had an N sanguinae for a few years, and in the past week or so the leaves have been browning. Because I'm not at home I can't get a picture for you quite yet, but the leaves are splotchy and a picture should be coming at around five today. So far it is only on the sanguinae, though it's in close contact with a maxima and miranda that might get it soon. I suspect cold or thripes, but I hope you can tell me more soon.

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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    Conditions need to be known, and a picture would definitely help in determining what, if anything is wrong. Old age causes browning leaves, cold can cause it, heat can cause it, insects, bad soil etc. N. sanguinea is a hardy plant, so if it's something detrimental there will probably be more signs. Thrips won't cause a really splotchy look (at least not in my experience), but instead warping, an almost crinkly appearance in some cases, and small discolored dots on affected areas.
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    As for conditions, I'm not sure of the specifics. It's about 45 degrees in the room it's in at night, and fifty during the day with the terrarium probably being hotter to about 60 during the day and fifty at night. Humidity is probably at about 60-70% in there. I know it's not old age causing browning leaves because this is on newer leaves. I did prop up a tub that had snow in it earlier against the terrarium, and if any leftover water dripped in it would have hit the sanguinae. That would probably be the easiest explanation. I'm just wondering what caused it because this is the first time in four years that I've ever seen one of my Nepenthes in anything less than perfect condition. The other five in that terrarium are still doing well.
    Last edited by Cruzzfish; 01-25-2016 at 05:13 PM.

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    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    60F is the warmest it gets??

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    Benurmanii's Avatar
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    Huh, why is it so cold? Is the terrarium in a garage? No nepenthes, except for a few ultra highland nepenthes (maybe not, I'm not a big nep grower), would appreciate temps that low, especially considering that N. sanguinea is more of an intermediate.
    Last edited by Benurmanii; 01-25-2016 at 05:44 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    60F is the warmest it gets??
    Only during December-February. It might get to 70 in the terrarium if the weather is sunny enough. The plants slow down during this time but don't stop growing. The maxima at least does a pitcher every two months in these conditions instead of once every five weeks. The rest of the year the room is hot.
    Quote Originally Posted by Benurmanii View Post
    Huh, why is it so cold? Is the terrarium in a garage? No nepenthes, except for a few ultra highland nepenthes (maybe not, I'm not a big nep grower), would appreciate temps that low, especially considering that N. sanguinea is more of an intermediate.
    It's cold because the room has a lot of windows in it, the outside weather is cold, and the room outside the terrarium is where my sundews, orchids, and VFTs sleep for the winter. The Nepenthes don't seem to particularly hate the low temperatures, they just slow down a lot. Then again I have hardy species such as the sanguinae, ventricosa, miranda hybrid, and maxima so they don't mind it as much. Neither do the Drosera adelae for that matter, although they do slow down also.

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    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    It looks like potential cold water damage.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    It looks like potential cold water damage.
    That's most likely seeing as I was making bad choices and left a tub that previously had snow in it up against the terrarium, and if any of the leftover snow stuck on the side fell in it would have landed on the sanguinae. That would also explain why it appeared overnight and why none of the other plants have a problem. As long as it isn't anything contagious I'm okay with it though, because cold damage will get better.

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