User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  1
Likes Likes:  2
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 9 to 15 of 15

Thread: Brass and Nepenthes

  1. #9

    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    12
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It's a fair point mate. Just out of interest I'll give it a go with the TDS meter.

    Years ago, I kept Sundews and VFT in a big copper dish - and they where happy as Larry. I certainly wouldn't advise anyone to do that, but looking back I'm surprised that those plants survived (and thrived)

    Quote Originally Posted by curtisconners View Post
    Ok, it appears that I was wrong.

  2. #10
    farmertom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    El Cerrito, ca
    Posts
    30
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Not to hijack this thread, but what kind of concern should you have about raising the conductivity of the water? are soluble salts the only thing that can add to that?

  3. #11
    Greetings from the netherworld. curtisconners's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Columbus Ohio, U.S.
    Posts
    923
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If I'm correct (I've been wrong before) it's not the conductivity of the water that hurts CP's it's that the minerals burn the roots of CP's.

  4. #12

    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    12
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I was initially concerned about the zinc content of brass, as I read that a neps hate zinc. In what quantity and why they hate it, I don't know. If anyone could explain the way heavy metals conflict with plants, that would be great

  5. #13
    Greetings from the netherworld. curtisconners's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Columbus Ohio, U.S.
    Posts
    923
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I was responding to farmertom's question. In response to your question about heavy metals, in humans lead can easily be mistaken by the body for other materials that are necessary for life functions. The lead doesn't work of course and the human starts to slowly die. It could be a similar case with zinc, but it's just a theory.
    Last edited by curtisconners; 03-10-2016 at 02:15 PM.

  6. #14
    Enthusiastic Enthusiast Zath's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    VA, USA
    Posts
    583
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't suppose you have any way of figuring out what the alloy actually is, do you? Contacting the manufacturer, perhaps?

    Alloyed brass with high-zinc content (to give that bright gold color), is also often alloyed with antimony, tin, or other additives, especially when it's for liquid applications, to prevent the leaching of zinc.

    That being said, regular use, without letting water sit in it for long periods will render your worries moot. Most of the corrosion effects are due to acidic water, either stagnant or slow-moving, or neutral ph water with a high salt content. Neither of which you should be using for your plants unless you occasionally make an acidic tannin or coffee solution, and again, as long as you don't let it sit, there's no reason to worry about it.

  7. #15
    An orchid fancier with a CP problem chibae's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    mid-Atlantic coast, USA
    Posts
    1,460
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by curtisconners View Post
    I was responding to farmertom's question. In response to your question about heavy metals, in humans lead can easily be mistaken by the body for other materials that are necessary for life functions. The lead doesn't work of course and the human starts to slowly die. It could be a similar case with zinc, but it's just a theory.
    Stating something as a fact, then putting "just a theory" at the end can be misleading to those who don't read the entire post. That said lead is NOT MISTAKEN by the body. It replaces zinc, calcium and iron in biochemical reactions and alters the shape of the resulting molecules beyond what the body can utilize. A detailed web search will explain exactly what happens within the body. There is a separate issue depending on which element is being replaced. An over abundance of zinc results in a copper deficiency which in turn results in a myriad of physical symptoms.
    If you are talking about the human body and physiology you need to be more precise.
    Last edited by chibae; 03-12-2016 at 07:09 AM.
    It's a tough life being a Sarracenia farmer
    My Grow List http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=123776

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. New nepenthes robcantleyi X nepenthes veitchii help
    By Alexkrein82 in forum Tropical Pitcher Plants  (Nepenthes)
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-03-2016, 08:51 AM
  2. New species of Nepenthes discovered, Nepenthes zygon.
    By Sashoke in forum Tropical Pitcher Plants  (Nepenthes)
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 12-16-2014, 05:04 PM
  3. LOOKING FOR NEPENTHES HAMATA RED HAIRY have lots of very rare nepenthes and helis
    By ElectrCarnvrs in forum Carnivorous Plant Trading Post
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-03-2013, 08:22 PM
  4. Trade: Nepenthes seeds for Nepenthes pollen
    By n bicalcarata in forum Carnivorous Plant Trading Post
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 12-17-2012, 01:43 PM
  5. hairy Nepenthes hamata or Nepenthes edwardsiana?
    By thez_yo in forum Tropical Pitcher Plants  (Nepenthes)
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: 04-01-2011, 05:43 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •