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Thread: Finally!

  1. #1

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    Well, I just checked one of the cuttings from my N. Coccinea and discovered a little growth node! I hope this means it's rooted. I didn't have a very high survival rate ( it was my first try) 1 of 6 ( I know, I know, pitiful). But still, I'm elated! My cutting rooted!

  2. #2
    NECPS President Dave S.'s Avatar
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    Congratulations! I am trying to get my first cutting (N. x Mixta Superba) to root right now. That must be a good feeling because I have been checking on mine for days watching for the first sign of new growth.

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    My best sucess with cuttings has been to put them into 2" seed pots (saves space). Planted (rather snugly, a wobbly plant won't root) in damp long fiber sphagnum and then kept about 12" under very bright lights (mine are under 6x 40 watt flourescents) inside a sealed terrarium and heavily misted every day or two but watering the soil very rarely so that the soil is only just barely moist. After I see the first few leaves with pitchers then transplant to a regular pot and water as normal.

    I've used the above method with success for N. rajah, N. maximax?#1, N. maxima x ? #2, N. Coccinea, N. macrophylla, N. campanulata, N. clipeata (these 3 arrived rootless), N. khasiana x ventricosa, N. morganiana, N, ventrata... I've forgotten the rest.

    So long as the cuttings are kept in high humidity with mistng daily or so and in barely moist soil, in bright light and in the correct temps you should have a success rate of 95-100%. As long as you are using soft green vine.
    I do not bother with the thick almost woody lowest part of an old nep vine (the part you have to cut with a hacksaw) which is very difficult to get started, and usually isn't worth the hassle of trying to get it rooted and growing.

    hope that helps a bit! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

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    NECPS President Dave S.'s Avatar
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    Quote (swords @ June 29 2003,04:31)
    hope that helps a bit! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img][/QUOTE]
    This does help. If nothing else, your success rate should give me some hope. I have my cutting setup just as you describe. I mostly likely read your advice in another post. I also kept two leaves on the cutting that have pitchers so that the cutting could use them to get moisture while the roots are forming. The other leaves I stripped off from the bottom or cut in half. I made a vertical cut up from the bottom to give the roots and easier time to grow into the media.

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    Swords, i was wondering about low-light neps like ampullaria. Would you recommend the same treatment for an amp (ie under bright lights, etc.)?
    There's no 'a' in perlite.

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    swords's Avatar
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    Neps like ampullaria, bicalcarata, etc. are called "lowlight" by so many authors but they should clarify what they mean by saying that these species will TOLERATE lowlight, not that they actually GROW BETTER in lowlight conditions. They will grow bigger pitchers, grow faster and be healthier overall in brighter light especially if you are growing with artificial light.

    The main problem with bright sun light is that bright sun evaporates humidity quickly and will burn plants, in a terrarium you can make things super bright but since the light source (bulbs) is seperated from the plants the humidity (if sealed in)remains far higher and you get the benefit of both extreme humidity and bright lighting (= quicker growth). My N. bicalcarata grows directly below a 400 watt metal halide and loves it (I got it as a 12" diameter plant in June of 2002), it is now 54" across and making 7" tall/round pitchers. My amps. (2 pure green variety) are directly under the 6 40 watt tubes they have 8" leaves with 2 1/2" tall pitchers and a main vine of 10" tall and they already have several basal shoots around the main stem with small pitchers.

    Do not be afraid to give your plants a little suntan by increasing the light, as long as the humidity is high they will adapt within a few leaves (i.e. months) and reward you more for all your efforts. This may mean slightly shorter and thicker leaves but bigger pitchers that last longer, depending upon the species of course. I was so careful with N. northiana giving it low light but I eventually moved it to the brightest lowland tank and it has grown far better/faster is now pitchering and is making 3" leaves and 3" pitchers that turn a awesome yellow with red speckles and slightly flaring striped peristome. Don't buy the lowlight hype, give 'em lotsa light (and humidity)!

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    Thanks swords, for clarifying that.

    How far beneath the MH lamp is your bical?
    There's no 'a' in perlite.

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    How do I root most of my nepenthes cuttings? I dip it in rooting hormones, and throw it in a jar of distilled water in a bright area... works every time
    [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/rolleyes.gif[/img]
    -Spec
    P.S.- I am currently trying sphagnum for two ventrata cuttings and a nepenthes velvet cutting [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/alien.gif[/img]

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