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Thread: Nepenthes feeding

  1. #113

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    I've tried feeding osmocote like fertilizer to the pitchers of my N. lowii like a month back. No problems with pitcher rot. The slow release fertilizer I used was 16 - 6 - 11 + 2Mg I think.

    The new leaf should unfurl in a couple of days to show some results, if there will be any.

  2. #114
    Flip_Side_the_Pint's Avatar
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    how many pellets did you put? I thought I heard somewhere that each pellet contains the different elements. SO feeding just one pellet maynot do anything as its only one element in an equation requiring three pellets?
    https://www.instagram.com/hull.jess/ (I post pics of my plants there)

  3. #115

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    I put about 2 pellets in each pitcher. The largest pitcher reaching about 10cm(4") in height. I tried this on 3 pitchers with different color combinations.

    The pellets are clearly colored green, orange, yellow, greyish.
    A color for each element perhaps?

    The growth of the new leaf is good. It's quite a bit bigger in comparison with the older leaf. But nothing super special.

    I'll try to measure the new leaf compared with a older one later.

  4. #116

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (The Griffin @ Mar. 06 2005,11:00)]I think that plant matter can be digested to an extent.
    In fact, some have postulated that N. ampullaria has evolved to catch whatever falls into it's pitchers from above. One person did a study of pitcher contents(I wish I remember who and where that article was) and ampullaria pitchers seem to have mostly detritus in those locations.

    Cheers,

    Joe
    From carnivore to detritivore? Isotopic evidence for leaf litter utilization by the tropical pitcher plant Nepenthes ampullaria
    Moran JA, Clarke CM, Hawkins BJ
    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PLANT SCIENCES
    164 (4): 635-639 JUL 2003

    Abstract:
    Nepenthes pitcher plants trap prey in specialized leaves formed into pitchers. Most lowland species live in open, sunny habitats and capture prey to obtain nutrients, principally nitrogen (N). Nepenthes ampullaria is commonly found under closed canopy forest and possesses morphological traits that indicate adaptation to trap leaf litter as a nutrient source. We tested this hypothesis by comparing foliar stable N isotope abundance (delta(15)N) between plants growing under forest canopy at 20 sites (litterfall present) and those growing in 20 open areas (no litterfall) in Borneo. Foliar delta(15)N values were significantly lower and total N concentrations were higher for the plants with access to litterfall. Using a mixing model, we estimated that N. ampullaria plants growing under forest canopy derived 35.7% +/- 0.1% of their foliar N from leaf litter inputs.
    There's no 'a' in perlite.

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  5. #117

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (JustLikeAPill @ Aug. 30 2004,10:17)]hmm... why do neps need protein at all? they don't have muscles...
    That's a good question, and requires a bit of understanding of biochemistry.

    All life on earth uses three basic building blocks, categorized as proteins (made up of amino acids), carbohydrates (made from sugars), and fats (lipids). These are obviously used to a greater or lesser extent depending on the type of life. However, they are present and necessary in all terrestrial life of which i'm aware. And here is the reason:
    carbohydrates are used for (typically short term) energy storage and transport (ever hear of "low blood sugar"?) and structure (cellulose in plants). Lipids are used for cell and other membranes (think "skin" for separating cells and parts of cells). Proteins are used for the "machinery", like the "factories" that convert sunlight to chemical energy (photosynthesis) or convert chemical energy to mechanical energy (muscles). Obviously this is a simplification.

    Anywho, carnivorous plants exhibit a classic tactic that could be called "resource exchange". They take a resource they have in excess and use it to obtain a resource they don't have. They use the abundant energy (sunlight), water, and carbon dioxide (from the air) to produce excess sugars, which they use for bait for insects. These insects are made up of (in part) protein, which provides the plants with nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium, which are all scarce in their habitat. So the plants are trading their extra sugars for proteins. This is why people try to use high-protein foods for their carnivorous plants: protein is what the plants are unable to get from other sources.

    As a side note, i don't believe that the enzymes in the plants attempt to capture energy from what they digest. They are simply trying to get at the raw resources. As mentioned, energy is not really a rare commodity in a healthy CP habitat.
    There's no 'a' in perlite.

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  6. #118

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    You are totally right! The only thing that carnivorous plants need is nitrogen which can be found in the base structure of every amino acid. If a plant wants to take energy from external sources, it would digest fats; in fact they are the best sources of energy because of their long carbonium chain riducted with hidrogenum.

  7. #119
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (LauraZ5 @ Mar. 25 2005,4:14)]May I please have the source on this,
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]You know they think that the upper N. lowii pitchers are adapted to catch bird poop?
    If you don't remember it that's fine. I know how these little facts float around in one's head and then pop out.
    I just saw this question and PM'ed the following answer to Laura, who felt I should share it with the class:
    According to the Savage Garden, and several other secondary sources I've found online, it is suspected that the upper pitchers of N. lowii are adapted to attract birds for their feces. The upturned lids of N. lowii's upper pitchers secrete a white goo (I think it's a thick nectar) from between the spines on the underside. Birds have been observed to land on the broad peristome, straddling the diameter of the pitcher, and eat the goo from the lid. When they defecate, it falls in the pitcher. I haven't seen any primary literature on this, but I think I've seen it suggested that some of N. lowii's relatives are also converging on this strategy. Strange huh?

    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

  8. #120

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    I get a five gallon bucket, add a plop of GrowMore Liquid SeaWeed fertilizer, a few drops of Superthrive and add water to dilute this. I can-ladel each pot with this blend every few weeks. I then go on with my life! Geezzzzusss too much fuss to tend with dead, frozen, dried, freeze-dried, live, chilled or even wild caught hushpuppies! No burns, no blackened, no malformed, no premature death, no discolored leaves, traps or growth.
    leave the bug capturing to ne[enthes, remember its their evolution to attract, capture and utilize bugs, not their training of us to get food for them (FEED ME SEYMOUR!!!!), they've been here when all the continents and islands were all connected, I'm sure they'll be around after we're far gone too!


    Just a mindful expression of mine. Don't take it seriously!

    Aloha from lala land!

    MM
    Morticia:\"Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatos nunc, 'We would gladly feast on those who try to subdue us.' Not just pretty words. but words to live by!\"

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