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Thread: Nepenthes feeding

  1. #25
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    BAD ROB!!!

    Yes it is perlite.. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/rolleyes.gif[/img] well some of it lol.

    I admit there is some slow release fertilizer there too. In a greenhouse packed with plants it is not feasible to hand feed everything to my satisfaction. So alternative methods are needed to keep the plants healthy and growing vigorously. I try not to get into talking to hobbiest about inorganic fertilizer simply because it is risky and a well feed Nepenthes the natural way will be just as healthy.

    Tony

    O yeah.. if you look realllly close you can read the label. N. lowii (from Trus Madi) Yep that's what it says! It's not though and I keep forgetting to return them for a credit. Can't imagine why.



    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  2. #26
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    I snapped this picture this morning. It doesn't show as much as I hoped it would.

    Some background. These are two flats of N. burkei growing under about 50% shade. They were not increasing much in size and they were looking a bit pale. Even with some attempts to feed the pitchers. For the most part the plants were all pretty similar in size. I was running around with my slow release fertilizer and decided I would try some on these flats. I was in a rush and these plants are packed tight. One of the challenges is trying to get the pellets down on the soil surface and not lodged in the leaf axils where it can cause considerable damage. These two flats were also in need of some cleaning up of old leaves and pitchers. Making it particularly difficult to apply fertilizer pellets. The result was that some got a decent supply while others ended up with barely any. If you look carefully you will see the result after a couple months later. You can still see some of the smaller paler plants that missed the feeding. (I have subsequently gone back and reapplied to those poor fellas). PLEASE keep in mind this is not a plug for folks to start throwing slow release fertilizer on their plants. I can not emphasize enough that results of such actions will vary significantly for each person and will depend greatly on how often you water, what kind is used, the plants it is given too etc. Without careful personal experimentation you risk serious injury to your plants. This is instead to further highlight how much Nepenthes can benefit from feeding. Plants fed the natural way would show very satisfactory results as well!
    Tony

    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  3. #27

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    Veerrry interesting, Tony. My ventricosa looks a lot like those "pale, unfed" plants, so i'd like to try feeding it. I've suspected for a while that the yellow tone is due to chlorolysis (sp?) from lack of some micronutrient, because i do feed the pitchers macro nutritional stuff. Does the slow-release you used have chelated iron, by chance?

    I'm thinking of spraying the plant with a very dilute solution of a micronutrient chelate powder i have. Would it be better to water with this than spray with it?
    There's no 'a' in perlite.

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  4. #28
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    D muscipula,

    The product I use does have macro and minor elements in it. Which include iron, calcium, magnesium, sulfur and some others.

    Overall pale color is generally attributed to insufficient nitrogen although it could be compounded by one or more deficiencies of minor elements.

    Magnesium deficiency will cause older leaves to yellow prematurely. Iron deficiency will cause new leaves to have interveinal chlorosis or in severe cases turn pure white. What are you giving your plants now? How often? and what strength?

    Plants grow at a steady pace. Feeding them a couple times a month or some such thing with liquid food is like feast/starve for them. Any benefit from the brief feeding is lost quickly when the plant is then starved for a week or two. Slow release fertilizer fixes this by giving the plant a little food every day. Feeding the plants regularly with insects also accomplishes the same task.
    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  5. #29

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    Sorry for my naughty post earlier Tony, just couldn't resist [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/tounge.gif[/img] I have little time to spend on the forum these days but feeding of Neps is never far from my mind. I think you are right though, natural feeding must surely be the best way if the quantity of plants in a collection permits. I wish we could do it here.

    The "N. lowii" you showed in the first post really is beautiful now isn't it? The latest leaf looks fabulous and it would be interesting indeed to see the pitcher that forms from that leaf. I am wondering if it will color up properly or not. I've found that a compromise between speed of growth and toughness and coloration of pitchers is necessary with slow-release fertilizers (at least the ones I've tried). There seems to be little limit to the size of the next leaf that can be produced if one doesn't mind tiny green pitchers. Red N. ampullaria can be turned entirely green by too much slow-release fertilizer but a few leaves later it reverts back to normal coloration.

    If one is seriously using slow release fertilizers then flushing through with a lot of water seems to be very important. Also monitoring of the pH of the media is advisable too. If pH goes too low that can lead to all sorts of problems. We repot at least every 4 to 6 months to overcome this risk. I'm off to the highlands in a few minutes time. I'll try to get a photo of the stalactites under our benches resulting from the extended use of slow release fertilizers. Perhaps we should break them off, grind them up and use them again to save costs [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img]
    Rob Cantley
    Nep Nut in Sri Lanka
    http://www.borneoexotics.com

  6. #30
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Interesting observation on pitcher size/color. I have not seen much of that happening although I suspect with such a dramatic increase in leaf size from one to the next on that 'N. lowii' that I will lose the 1:1 pitcher/leaf ratio. Mostly my experience is with the highlands and perhaps your observation is more with lowlands? You mention the N. ampullaria which I don't have as much experience with. Or perhaps it is related to the type used and/or the species. Or perhaps it is from amount applied. I will deffinately take a picture when it opens up. The new leaf in the picture is unfolding now too.

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  7. #31
    Moderator Cindy's Avatar
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    The neps sold at our local shops all have slow-release fertilisers in the soil. These little yellow round things are found even with very young plants freshly out from tissue culture.

    I agree with Borneo that heavy watering is required if one wants to use the fertilisers. I've learnt it the hard way when a plant I bought had its pitchers all browning within a week. I watered it only once in two days.
    Cindy

  8. #32

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    Quote (Dave S. @ June 27 2003,06:24)
    I learned that fish food trick on the same day, go figure. I have seen dramatic results from using koi food pellets. I did my own experiment using three N. x Judith Finns that were all about the same size. I fed one with the koi pellets, one with ants, spiders, etc. and I left the third one alone. The very next leaves and pitchers nearly doubled in size on the koi pellet food. The other two continued to grow at the previous pace. I have since switched them all to koi pellets and add an occasional bug now and then.[/QUOTE]
    where do u get this stuff i cant find it anywhere
    pm me
    I love nepenthes

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