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Thread: Getting larger pitcher's

  1. #9

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    Quote (colinliew @ Sep. 11 2003,9:17)
    Hmm...I'll have to try that soon.[/QUOTE]
    me too
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  2. #10
    goldtrap2690's Avatar
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    cool , i'll have to try this osmtimes , but what about plants that grow up right and the pitcher are just hanging in mid air ?

  3. #11

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    just try getting the tendril wrapped around a strand or two of sphagnum moss and then put a pocket size ziplock bag around it??. It may work beautifully!!

    Gus

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    Augustin, how long would you recommend leaving the pitcher that way? Up until the pitcher opens?

  5. #13
    Moderator Cindy's Avatar
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    I've got ziplock bags (the type for medication) on my bicalcurata, albomarginata and alata. They've been with me for months, grewing very well with much larger leaves than before, but no pitchers. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/confused.gif[/img]

    I sprayed a little distilled water into each bag and folded the two corners at the bottom so that the bag will "puff" up a little. Otherwise the tendril will touch the side of the bag, which is wet.

    Will update as soon as I see a change.
    Cindy

  6. #14

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    I did this some years ago to convince non pitchering nepenthes to pitcher while cultivating on the windowsill. This might be interesting for people with large plants and low humidity. It seemed to work, but it is also difficult to place it on very young and soft leafes. I used tiny zip lock bags with sphagnum or just some (weight! ) drops of water in it. Once the pitcher started growing I removed the bags.

    Best, Volker
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  7. #15

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    this would explain why my N.Spec has so large pitchers for it's size all of it's pitcher lay on live sphagnum moss
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  8. #16

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    At the risk of sounding argumentative, I'd like to point out that while I don't doubt that resting developing pitchers on sphagnum may result in increased pitcher size, it is highly unlikely that the benefit conferred has anything to do with humidity. First, consider the fact that a plant requires good conditions in its entire growing space to do well, not just locally optimal conditions for one leaf! Secondly, if one considers the diffusion of water vapor though air, the local effect of a wad of damp moss is essentially nonexistent! This is equivalent to the myth that putting a plant over a saucer full of water will supply it with adequate humidity in an otherwise dry environment. It just does not work.

    Rather, I think that the reason people are seeing increased pitcher size in this context is simply due to the fact that the developing tendrils have support (they are not hanging). Consequently, larger pitchers may grow from such points without putting undue strain on the plant itself. I've observed this phenomenon many times, with plants growing in many different media. A particular example which comes to mind is that of an N. rafflesiana which was producing an upper pitcher for me about six years ago. As the tendril lengthened, I placed a wooden dowel in its path, around which it subsequently wound. This dowel was anchored to provide support to the pitcher which developed from the tendril, and it grew into the largest N. rafflesiana upper I've ever had -- 40 cm long! It was fantastic, and the dowel provided no extra humidity at all!

    The moral of the story: if you want larger pitchers, provide optimal conditions for the entire plant, and support the tendrils as they develop with whatever you have at hand.

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