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Thread: N. ephippiata

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    Unhappy

    Hi Guys,
    I just aquired this plant and I plan on growing it like a typical highlander. I've read it's a lot like lowii in requirements....I think my daytime temps will be in the high 70's to low 80's and night will be be low 60's to high 50's (accept for Late June, July and August....it should be ok in an intermediate to low back to intermediate conditions for a few months, right?), plenty humid, and lots of light. Also found a statement on the interenet that it responds favorable to getting fed. Anything else I should know, or is any of this mis-information? Thanks!
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

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    Mine has grown great with daytime temps around 85 and night time temps around 55... for the three weeks i've had it, anyway. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img]

    There doesn't seem to be much info online, does there? We'll have to compare notes in a few months, because our plants are about the same size right now.
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    N. ephippiata grows from around 1300-1900m elevation according to Clarke and down to 1000-1900m according to Jebb & Cheek. My experience with this plant (for only about 6-9 months) is that it prefers the cooler daytime temps (70-80) and colder nights (50-60), in otherwords highland conditions. I do not know the elevation of the form of N. ephippiata I have it may be from higher ground. The growth is nicer in cooler temps.

    Anybody else notice that N. ephippiata has no pitcher spur? It's the only one in my collection with no spur behind the lid. N. lowii's is tiny but it still has one.

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    There doesn't seem to be much info online, does there? [/QUOTE]
    True dat! Well, I'll be keeping an eye on it, as it has an imature pitcher still forming....if the pitcher aborts, well I guess it could be from getting uprooted....I guess I should keep and eye on the NEW leaf, with just a pitcher bud. I gave it a feed, so hopefully it will spring to life (as much as any true highlander ever "springs" anyway).

    Swords, thanks for that. I only found Clarke's info, not the other source....I guess our experience will have to be the indicator. With regards to the spur, I'll check when I get home.
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

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    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    N. ephippiata seems to like my greenhouse climate. It receives about 75-80F daytime and 55-50F nightime. High humidty and frequent mist with the misting system. No shade cloth at the moment and the N. glabrata almost had purple leaves!

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    You can take a look at this. I've been growing this species for a number of years, and can tell you that, while it is not difficult to grow, it is slow. Moreover, it also appreciates frequent watering; Charles Clarke has told me that this species grows in areas which receive rainfall almost daily. I don't think that there are many mature specimens in cultivation, a fact which I attribute more to lack of availability than anything else.

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    neps, is that your website? I've used it many times, and it's very helpful. Good work!

    How come you have nothing on N. diatas? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/confused.gif[/img]

    You mention different varieties of N. mirabilis, but give no specifics. I bought an echinostoma the other day and found it surprisingly hard to find anything specific to that variety - since you seem to have first-hand experience with different varieties, it would be great if you could elaborate a bit more on the different varieties and what you know about them. Just a thought...

    I have all my highlands in a 10 gallon, and for now, i just put it outside at night. As winter approaches, that becomes a risky proposition. Do all highlands tolerate temperatures in the 40s? I'm sure my N. hamata, N. diatas, and N. ephippiata will love it, but what about N. ramispina or N. burbidgea, etc?
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    neps, is that your website? I've used it many times, and it's very helpful. Good work!
    [/QUOTE]

    Yes, it is my website, and I'm happy that it has been of use to you! Thanks for your kind words.

    Quote
    You mention different varieties of N. mirabilis, but give no specifics. I bought an echinostoma the other day and found it surprisingly hard to find anything specific to that variety - since you seem to have first-hand experience with different varieties, it would be great if you could elaborate a bit more on the different varieties and what you know about them. Just a thought...[/QUOTE]

    Well, the reason I don't bother to be very specific regarding N. mirabilis is simply because I've found every variety I grow responds well to typical lowland conditions. Really, they all seem to be very easy to grow, including the newly discovered N. mirabilis v. Rowanae.

    Quote
    I have all my highlands in a 10 gallon, and for now, i just put it outside at night. As winter approaches, that becomes a risky proposition. Do all highlands tolerate temperatures in the 40s? I'm sure my N. hamata, N. diatas, and N. ephippiata will love it, but what about N. ramispina or N. burbidgea, etc?[/QUOTE]

    Temperature tolerance is quite species specific, but generally speaking things should be OK unless temps get really cold (e.g., below 7 C). Just make sure that plants warm up into the mid 20's C during the day.

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