User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 9 to 15 of 15

Thread: N x wrigleyana

  1. #9
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Far Away NY
    Posts
    4,640
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think we are not understanding each other 100% here. I was not refering to order of the parents used. I was refering to the variety of the parents used. There are plenty of tall thin N. rafflesiana as there are short squat N. mirabilis. You could make N. coccinea for example come out any number of ways just by using different forms of each parent. Tall thin squat wide red speckled green.. you name it.
    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  2. #10

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    825
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    i get what you are saying now. your talking about using diff forms of the plant. yes, there are plenty of diff kinds of N.rafflesiana and N.mirabilis
    George McKay

    In The End We are All Dead
    Florida

  3. #11

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    Posts
    2,974
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Tony,

    I thought N. coccinea was a particular clone using those parents back from Victorian days, and there are several other clones with different names using the same combination, but looking slightly different.
    Now after saying that, how can there be TC plants of N. coccinea, unless someone cloned them from meristem?

    Regards,

    Joe

  4. #12
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Far Away NY
    Posts
    4,640
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I see what your saying Joe. It is my understanding (which is at times minimal) that the victorian hybrids were named according to cross name. Much like a registered orchid hybrid or a natural hybrid. If you look at the registered names at the ICPS data bank you wont find N. x coccinea or any of the other hybrids N. x (). So in essense you can have different 'clones' of these particular hybrids floating around.

    On the other hand it is possible to give a registered name to one of these hybrids. But then it would be called something else entirely. For example N. kashiwa is N. ampullaria x N. rafflesiana = N. x hookeriana

    Personally why they don't use the grex clone naming system is beyond me.. it avoids so much confusion and maintains so much information within the name. For example N. x hookeriana 'kashiwa' .... ok I am going off on a tangent..

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  5. #13

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    Posts
    2,974
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Tony,

    I don't think that was a tangent. It was a very useful piece and it made some sense.
    I heard in Australia, they recreated N. dicksoniana. I was talking to somebody about it, and they told me that you can't recreate it: you can make the cross and call it something else. I can't remember who it was I was corresponding with, so I don't want to throw names out there. Somebody should put this topic on their "to-do" list, so people would know what N. coccinea clone they have or if it can be called that. I think the TC ones come from Holland.

    Regards,

    Joe

  6. #14
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Westchester County, New York
    Posts
    5,377
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Lightbulb

    Wow. Now my curiosity is REALLY piqued! How can I tell What...er...type of Coccinea that I have? Just based on visual cues? Or do I need to delve deeper, track down the VERY nice person who trade me the cutting, and find out where they got it, then track them down, etc?
    I love this hybrid. I really want to know more about it. It's growing so big, so fast and so well. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  7. #15
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Westchester County, New York
    Posts
    5,377
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    heck maybe when they both flower (I won the Wrigly from Ludwig...THANKS LUDWIG!!&#33[img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img], I'll cross THEM. Then we'll have:
    (N. rafflesiana x N. ampullaria) x N. mirabilis)
    X
    (N. mirabilis x (N. rafflesiana x N. ampullaria))

    (or the reverse, depending). Of course I'm assuming that I'll have one of each sex...We'll see.

    Think I'll call it the NxSchloaty [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/tounge.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img]
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. S. Wrigleyana vs. S. 'Scarlet Belle'
    By blokeman in forum Pitcher Plants: (Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Darlingtonia, Cephalotus)
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 03-24-2013, 11:16 AM
  2. N. x Wrigleyana
    By Capslock in forum 2006 NASC Benefit Auction
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 07-10-2006, 06:28 PM
  3. Does S. Wrigleyana
    By SnowyFalcon in forum Pitcher Plants: (Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Darlingtonia, Cephalotus)
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 12-02-2003, 07:30 AM
  4. Sarracenia wrigleyana
    By aea3 in forum Pitcher Plants: (Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Darlingtonia, Cephalotus)
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-23-2002, 01:10 PM
  5. S. x wrigleyana (Sarracenia leucophylla x psittacina)
    By in forum Pitcher Plants: (Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Darlingtonia, Cephalotus)
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 01-11-2002, 11:26 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •