User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 17 to 24 of 31

Thread: Pruning n. ampullaria

  1. #17

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Cambridge, MA, USA
    Posts
    818
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    At the New England CP show i was talking to Thomas of Dangerous Plants, and he said he has great luck getting basal rosettes to form on amps by letting them dry out just to the point the leaves start to wilt on the edge. Says it has worked every time for him, and he is just trying to get up his courage to try it on his red amp.

    So, even if your basal rosette grows, you know how to trigger a new one to form.

    I'm excited to finally have an amp of my own (thanks again, WildBill), considering it was the first nepenthes i remember seeing (in a National Geographic decades ago), and very nearly the first CP, at that. It is a cutting, and has developed the first new pitcher. I'm curious what kind of lighting you all give your amps. Is a single fluorescent tube a few inches away enough, or does it need more? I've heard both ways - that they like low light, and that they like a lot of light. I want basal rosettes!!!!

    Second question: how extensive (and deep) is the root system? I noticed while repotting my N. alata and by observation of some N. gracilis that the first has a very limited root system, while the second has a very extensive one. Does it tend to be lowlands that have more roots?

    Sorry to take the thread off topic....
    There's no 'a' in perlite.

    My Growlist
    NECPS.org - New England CP growers unite!

  2. #18

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    146
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    D muscipula,

    In my opinion, all lowland neps I've seen like several hours or more of direct sunlight each day, preferably not in Florida afternoons. The more light they get the more the leaves look healthy and the pitchers look colorful -- and they grow faster -- until it is too much light and the leaves brown and die.

    When I get a tripod for my camera I'll show some good before and after leaves when the light got a massive increase.

    Rafflesiana, bicalcarata, spec., and red ampullaria (plus almost everything else: northiana notably excepted) are all growing nice leaves and pitchers under lots of natural sunlight. Again, not in our Florida afternoons. The tricolor is a tough little hombre. It seemed to keep growing in shipping. I have a new pitcher that looks nice and red (yellow, and dark red), but I really need some way to steady the camera.

  3. #19

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Manchester, Connecticut
    Posts
    628
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    D muscipula -

    I had the parent plant in a terrarium under 2 shoplights (4 bulbs, 2 old growlight bulbs, 2 warm bulbs). The crown was maybe 4 to 6 inches below the lights:

    [img]http://home.**********.com/wildbill/CPtank.jpg[/img]



    On the way to the show, the cramped plant sort of 'unsprung' and wouldn't fit back in the tank after I got home. Last night I repotted it and also took 4 basal cuttings. Let's hope they root too.

    WildBill

  4. #20

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Cambridge, MA, USA
    Posts
    818
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks Bill and Beagle. It seems there are more who would say "more light is better" than the opposite. As soon as i magically become a handyman overnight, i'll make the 4-bulb hood for the terrarium that i've been planning. In the meantime, it will have to do with three assorted small fluorescents and about 30 minutes of setting sun.

    I'm curious how John grows his- it always looks quite nice.

    Tricolor == Mmmm, mmm, good!

    Me == jealous
    There's no 'a' in perlite.

    My Growlist
    NECPS.org - New England CP growers unite!

  5. #21
    swords's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Cernunnos Woods
    Posts
    8,120
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I give my plants all the light I can fit over their growing environment. Over my 75 gallon terrarium I use six 40 watt tubes, 240 watts. This colors the leaves very nicely and N, northiana does very well with this intense light. To add to the brightness I surrounded all sides of the tank with tinfoil to reflect the light back at the plants. The tinfoil also helps to insulate the tank and the temp inside gets extremely hot (great for lowlanders) You will burn the leaves if you jump to this much light right away. The new growth will be acclimated and new pitchers nicer and bigger but your old leaves may get all spotty. I'm of the opinion that more light is better (especially if you are using artificial light). I can not comment on real sunlight as I have zero experience using sunlight for growing neps in a green house situation. I tried a garden center hybrid in the kitchen window (only good light in the house) but the house is so dry they wouldn't pitcher even with twice daily misting so I never tried it again.

    On the other large sized grow chambers I use metal halides and large power compact strips for saltwater reef tanks.

  6. #22

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    518
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    N. ampullaria is very malleable. It can be trained or pruned to a variety of forms to suit particular growing environments from small terrariums, to large greenhouses. The photos beow are of plants grown from tissue culture which both started out with a single growing pint but have been pruned back twice but at different stages to achieve a desired effect. The first photo shows a plant intended to be less than 4" dia. but squat, with as many pitchers as possible and the second is intended to be less than 4" dia. but tall.

    The pot by the way is 8cm (3") in diameter





    Oh and yes, the cuttings are available, you just need to come and pick them up [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/tounge.gif[/img]
    Rob Cantley
    Nep Nut in Sri Lanka
    http://www.borneoexotics.com

  7. #23

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Cambridge, MA, USA
    Posts
    818
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote (Borneo @ Oct. 14 2003,11:3[img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/alien.gif[/img]
    Oh and yes, the cutting are available, you just need to come and pick them up [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/tounge.gif[/img][/QUOTE]
    You've got a mean streak, you know that? Sure, just let me hop on a plane...

    Beautiful plants!

    I guess if those are in a 3" pot, my cutting is fine. Rob, do you have an opinion on how much difference pot size can make, and how much that varies from one species to another? It seems my gracilis will fill anything with roots, but does it grow better because of it?
    There's no 'a' in perlite.

    My Growlist
    NECPS.org - New England CP growers unite!

  8. #24

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    518
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think the importance of pot size really varies from species to species and even more so with the particular environment you are tryig to grow the plants in. Some Nepenthes, especially lowlanders will grow a root system that will fill just about any pot. Highlanders are rather different, some have even evolved a mechanism for collecting water in the pitchers (N. lowii and N. ephippiata for example) and may have almost no root system in the wild. N. rajah has a strange desire to put out roots laterally and therefore does well in a wide pot or tray (This may be because in the wild it grows on a thin layer of media bedded by impenetrable rock).

    We've accidentally grown 4' dia. N. bicalcarata in 3" dia. pots (really). The plats have appeared perfectly healthy and not stunted at all. Of course they have a tendency to fall over! It seems to me that so long as the roots can collect enough water in the heat f the day (and that nursery is very humid) then that is the most important thing. I can take a photo right now of some large highland hybrids that are in 3" dia. pots and are not happy because they suck the media dry since the nursery they are in is designed to promote flowering and is harsh on the plants. Smaller plants in 3" dia. pots in the same nursery remain wet, so the amount of water the plant sucks up is relevant to the sze of pot you choose, it seems. Of course all sorts of other factors come into play, how often you water, how you water, how much water the media retains, etc. etc. Fungal pathogens that attack roots can severly inhibit root function too. These are probably more common than many people might imagine.

    I'm indoors ramblng on. Should be in the nursery. Naughty Rob! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/mad.gif[/img]
    Rob Cantley
    Nep Nut in Sri Lanka
    http://www.borneoexotics.com

  9. Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

    Similar Threads

    1. N.ampullaria pruning?
      By Exo in forum Tropical Pitcher Plants  (Nepenthes)
      Replies: 13
      Last Post: 07-25-2010, 10:16 AM
    2. Pruning question
      By ALLOSAURZ in forum Pitcher Plants: (Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Darlingtonia, Cephalotus)
      Replies: 2
      Last Post: 09-01-2004, 05:53 PM
    3. Pruning?
      By BradJordan in forum Venus Flytrap (Dionaea ) Care Information & Tips
      Replies: 3
      Last Post: 03-12-2004, 04:41 PM
    4. Pruning
      By Darcie in forum Tropical Pitcher Plants  (Nepenthes)
      Replies: 7
      Last Post: 02-27-2003, 09:56 PM
    5. Pruning flowers
      By tricky in forum Venus Flytrap (Dionaea ) Care Information & Tips
      Replies: 1
      Last Post: 06-12-2002, 01:30 PM

    Tags for this Thread

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •