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Thread: Thinking of getting one

  1. #1

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    Well, my flytrap has been doing really well, so Im thinking of expanding, and the nepthes has caught my eye. However, its a lot harder to find information on growing them, so I was wondering if yall would like to share any general tips. I live in south texas, so humidity is high. But all Im wondering is like, does it need distilled water like the vft? Does it have a dormant period and a growing period? And heres one that really confuses me: Ive heard that it grows like a vine, and Ive seen those little vine stakes advertised for them, but Ive also seen lots of pictures where its not growing up anything at all. Care to clarify? Thanks!

  2. #2

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    This is what PFT.com says about them:




    Introduction:
    The Tropical Pitcher Plant (nepenthes) is a fascinating species of carnivorous plants that grows in jungles and wooded areas around the world. With the numerous species, identification can be very difficult for the novice. For this reason, Exotic Gardens carries very few nepenthes, all of which are perfect for the beginner.
    Conditions for these plants vary greatly, as their natural habitats can be very dim light and warm temperatures to brighter light and cool temperatures. Nepenthes are generally classified in two main categories - Highland and Lowland species. Some growers choose to use a third classification of 'intermediate' which is between high and lowland. Our plants are generally forgiving and can be grown in medium light and high humidity, making them perfect for terrariums.


    Watering:
    Nepenthes enjoy moist soil, but not soggy or spongy. Unlike other carnivorous plants, watering with the 'tray method' or letting the plant stay in standing water is NOT recommended. The root system may rot in soil that is kept too moist. Water regularly with distilled water from the top of the soil and let drain thoroughly. If the plant is kept in a humid environment or terrarium, watering once weekly is usually sufficient.


    Humidity & Air Circulation:
    Nepenthes plants enjoy an environment of high humidity and stagnant air. The pitchers on these plants develop rapidly where air humidity is significantly above average and air is considered 'stale'. These conditions are perfect for all sizes of terrariums.


    Light:
    Nepenthes make use of a wide variety of lighting conditions. Lowland species require less light, making them appropriate for dwelling at the bottom larger terrariums. Highland species enjoy more light and develop quickly under bright florescent lighting on 12 hour cycles.Temperatures:
    Nepenthes usually live in more mild conditions in order to keep their pitchers from drying out. In captivity, it is recommended to keep the plants between 72 and 82 degrees. Lowland species usually tolerate warmer conditions where highland species are best suited for cooler temperatures.


    Food:
    Most people choose to not feed the traps of their nepenthes in fear of bacteria damaging the trap and ultimately killing it (trap only). Some growers rely on fertilizers in various mixes to force a plant to produce larger pitchers. This practice is not recommended as it may exhaust the plant; however, light fertilization is usually tolerated well by most nepenthes.


    Soil:
    Nepenthes show the best growth and survive the longest in acidic soil. The nepenthes plant you have includes Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss (shredded). This moss has an extremely high acid content allowing the plant to remain strong and healthy. If you choose to replant your nepenthes, you will need to use a comparable Peat Moss often found at hardware stores. Brands vary, but most Canadian types are the best growing soils. In addition, the Sphagnum Peat is VERY dense (unless using live moss) and needs perlite for the root system and ventilation/drainage. If Peat moss is used without a means of drainage, the roots of your tropical pitcher plant may rot. Replacement moss and perlite may be purchased directly from this site for transplant. In addition, many growers are successful in growing nepenthes in live sphagnum moss or in long fiber sphagnum moss for the best drainage. The variety of nepenthes sold by Exotic Gardens can be planted in any of the above soils and grow with success.




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  3. #3

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    This pretty much covered it, but about the vine part, after they have grown a complete ground rosette (which can take up to ten years) (or on N. gracilis, 10 months) then it will begin to clib and form a vine while doing so. GOOD LUCK!! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/alien.gif[/img]
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  4. #4

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    Arrow

    Nepenthes are great plants. This species is my favorite kind of Cp. Since you live in South Texas you will need it to be in a 50% shaded area. Nepenthes do need distilled water. All Cp's need distilled water. It doesn't have a dormant period since it is a tropical plant.You can grow your plant ot side year round and water it. When watering it sheck if the soil mix is moist if it isn't then water the plant(s). It matters on what kind of species of nepenthes you will get. The species I would mstly recommened on getting for a beginner is a Lowland nep. The temps that you get outside will make it very easy for you to grow. The temps should be between 74*F- low 90's is ok. The humidity for lowlanders and highland neps from as low as 50% to 99.7%. Plant recommended for a beginner is N. Gracilis, N. Madagascarnisis, N. Rafflesiana, N. Ventrata, N. Truncata, N. Sanguinea. Those are all great plants to et ater having enough experince with lowlanders you can try a beginner highland nep. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img] --Phil
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  5. #5
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    Hi FTF,
    For individual species cultivation info, try this link:

    Nep university

    It describes the requirements of several species.
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

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