User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 9 to 16 of 25

Thread: N. ephippiata

  1. #9

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    518
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the feedback Joel, our plants are nursery grown for at least 1 year, and most for several years. However, I do agree with what you say about the species without the waxy cuticle. Generally though, Neps seem to be far more adaptable than many people (including me) thought. I really ought to rewrite the cultivation section on our website soon.

    I see there's another thread about growing outdoors so I'm off to take a look at that. Hope the fires aren't too close to you!

    Rob
    Rob Cantley
    Nep Nut in Sri Lanka
    http://www.borneoexotics.com

  2. #10

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    50
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi Joel,

    Yesterday, I came across a piece of cleared land, opposite a condominium, about the size of two football fields. In this piece of land are tall grass and many, many, many plants of N. mirablis. The plants are very healthy with very thick stem.

    The point is N. mirablis can take on full sun.

    Choong

  3. #11

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    792
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    After seeing these pictures, i think i am broiling my baby tentaculata. three out of the 5 leaves are purple. I did realize that they were burning, but i never thought it could be fatal, could it??. Most of my neps received just enough light to grow healthy. Now i am experimenting by placing them under 2 X 36 watt bulbs. I never thought these bulbs could be so strong.

    If you look at the thread N. burbidgeae, people have a complete different opinion about strong light levels there.

    Swords: what is your opinion??

    Gus

  4. #12
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Far Away NY
    Posts
    4,640
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Personally I like to give my plants as much light as they will tolerate and still grow healthy. That way I know I am maximizing the plant's ability to process nutrients and give me big colorful pitchers on stocky disease and insect resistant plants.

    There are some catchs though!

    Not all species and hybrids will adjust equally well to certain light levels. Cultural conditions will play a HUGE roll in a plants ability to handle various light levels! Air circulation, temperature, humidity levels, plant nutrition, light source etc. can make or break a plant's ability to handle a certain light intensity. For this reason I don't think you can compare one grower to the next easily. Many Nepenthes will produce anthocyanin in the leaves. I think this is the best indicator that the plant is receiving good light to grow properly. Each grower must experiment with their own plants to really get a feel for and understand what is too little, too much or just the right amount of light.

    To answer your question Gus about fatal burning. I don't think it would be fatal unless it was a case where a tender plant used to dense shade was subjected to full blazing sun and the entire growth point was fried crispy. Even then it would most likely sprout new shoots lower down the stem. Is it possible to overexpose to where you have gone over the edge and are now hurting the plant in the long term?? Absolutely

    Tony



    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  5. #13
    swords's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Cernunnos Woods
    Posts
    8,120
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    What are 36 watt bulbs? Are these 4 ft flourescents or screw in type power compacts? Either way, this little bit of light could not possily hurt your plant. None of my plants grow under anything less than 250 watts and they are all happy and pitchering nicely.

    I do not think it is possible to do longterm damage to terrarium and indoor grown plants under artificial light if you have adequate humidity. The COLOR of leaves doesn't matter as much as the FEEL. A red or purplish leaf that is still succulent (thick and fleshy) is generally fine and is simply reacting to brighter/adequate light. New leaves the plant produces will not be the same reddish color and within a few months the plant will likely be growing plain old green leaves or only have a hint of red.

    If the leaves are red and then begin to turn brown and crispy in the center of the red spots then that is actual burning and you have too low humidity. Simply figure out a way to increase the humidity. Teh plants will stop burning and begin to pitcher when conditions are appropriate.

    Like Tony, I try to subject my plants to the brightest light I can by covering the entire top of all my growing chambers with artificial light for intense, even lighting. Tony grows in a greenhouse using natural sunlight, so the methods are different. In my experience if the leaves of a new plant turn red or purple I know that I have it in a well lit position. If they do not color up with a few weeks of arrival I will move them to a spot where they do. I looked at my N. burbideae after that post on purple leaves, mine was too on the old growth. I hadn't paid that much attention as all my plants do the color change. The new leaves are simply bright green with only a touch of red.

  6. #14

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    792
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thank you gentlemen. If 2 X 36 W. bulbs is not much when compared to your 250 W, then my tentaculata is just having a good time!!

    The way some of the other cp colleagues expressed regarding N. eppiphiata burning its leaves, well, it gave me the impression that there was something negative about it. But i think we needed to find a concensus about the purple colouring of the leaves, and i think we've found one. Thanks again


    gus

  7. #15
    swords's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Cernunnos Woods
    Posts
    8,120
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't think Joachim's N. ephippiata looks bad at all, the only spot which might give me some concern is on the leaf in the lower right corner of the pot which has some brown but it still looks fleshy. Also, I can't tell how old that leaf may be, it may be naturally dying off as my ephippiatas old leaves did die off from the edges in such a manner. I don't know how the leaves formed in my conditions will go as none of them have died off yet.

  8. #16

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Munich/ Germany
    Posts
    348
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (swords @ Nov. 05 2003,7:22)]I don't think Joachim's N. ephippiata looks bad at all, the only spot which might give me some concern is on the leaf in the lower right corner of the pot which has some brown but it still looks fleshy. Also, I can't tell how old that leaf may be...
    Hi,

    the black spot on this leaf is dead and dried up. It is the second youngest leaf, only the one to the left is newer. The red blotches on the other leafes also don't look good, all leafes were grown under these light levels. From my experience slight light burn results in a more uniform red colour of the leafes.

    I'm still quite confident that the light levels were too high for this N. ephippiata.

    Cheers Joachim

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •