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Thread: N. ephippiata

  1. #17

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    I also was under the impression that as long as the temps and humidity were right, you could not have too much light in an artificial setting. Oh well, live and learn.

    Regards,

    Joe

  2. #18
    swords's Avatar
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    Joe,
    Joachim is not growing in totally artificial light, only supplemental artificial light (after dark). Mainly he is using his "bay window" terrarium (if it's the same one on his website) the autumn sun will fry just about anything and everything by being lower in the sky and still warm, along with the air getting drier with the onset of winter. All my aroids, aristolochia and sarracenia outside were burned crispy this fall even in "full shade" with plenty of watering. Fluorescent lighting is incomparable to true sunlight. Radiant heat from sunlight can cause severe burning if the humidity drops at all. There is more leeway with normal fluorescents as the light will take far longer to evaporate the water in the growing area.

    The light from normal fluorescents and compact fluorescents do not emit much heat even when there is a lot of them used in one space.However, if you place your hand in a direct beam of sunlight (or even metal halide lighting) you can feel that the actual light is warm/hot (that's why cats like to lay in a sunny window). Humidity is crucial in such a brightly lit environment, fluctuation during the brightest light hours will allow burning to occur.

    On my large intermediate/lowlander chamber if the humidistat or humidifier burns out the plants will fry because that chamber is lit by metal halides who create a mild radiant heat (not as intense as true sunlight though). I set it up last winter and before I got the humidistat set up correctly I had burned a few leaves that being my first experience with using metal halides. Now all is well.

    If you will recall a post a while back where Rob explained his and another fellows "flowering Nep houses" on which they use almost no shade cloth to allow huge ebbs and flow of sunlight and I am assuming this causes a decrease in humidity during the highest light hours. Rob made a statement something similar to: ..the plants do not look pretty, burned and some with no pitchers but they were all aparently healthy and flowering.

    But those are larger plants, not seedlings like Joachims which may or may not be more fragile to intense light. I would imagine it would only be Aug, Sept and maybe Oct when the light levels would be highest for Joachim, if he could sheild the smallest plants with a sheer white curtain it would be enough to diffuse the setting autumn sun.

  3. #19

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    Hi,

    about half a year my N. ephippiata is growing under lower light levels - shaded by my N. villosa (I just love this comment... ). As Rob wrote, pitchers colour up a bit more when being more mature and also the first britles can be seen below the pitcher lid. The burned blotches have totally disappeared, but the plant is growing at a very slow rate by now. It produces one leaf every two months.

    [img]http://home.**********.com/joachim/N_ephippiata_290304_B.jpg[/img]

    [img]http://home.**********.com/joachim/N_ephippiata_290304_A.jpg[/img]

    Cheers Joachim

  4. #20
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    Hey Joachim,
    Very nice! Now long does it take for them to color up like that? I have an open pitcher on mine (for about 1 month or so, I'd guess), and the petrisome is stiped, but the pitcher body isn't getting that red hue.
    17 Nash Rd.
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  5. #21
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Very nice Joachim! now...about that N. villosa, shading your other plants! Lets have a look at it as well!

    Cheers!

  6. #22

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    question: does high light levels give the plant bigger pitchers?

    i had before done an experiment a while ago with milk in pitchers, right now i am noticing all the plants i gave it to are geting huge leaves and TINY pitchers, sunday i left my little green house in the sun for a while, =/

    my raff got sun burned and but inside was HOT and HUMID, i noticed that the new leave that was about to come out of the other leaf in my bical came out AND already started to grow ans another leaf, i can tell that it liked it VERY MUCH


    if higher light levels increase pitcher size out they go once more, heh
    Expression = Maneuverability x Coiffure squared

  7. #23

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    Light levels are definitely one of the factors that determine pitcher size and even whether the plant pitchers or not. Perhaps light is the most important factor but probably not the only one.

    In the wild it's common to find beautiful plants growing in the open on the margin of a forest (e.g. N. rafflesiana) whilst a few feet away in the heavy shade of the forest the same species can be found without any pitchers at all. However, it's species dependent. Alongside the pitcherless N. rafflesiana one might find a N. ampullaria with huge pitchers the size of your fist.
    Rob Cantley
    Nep Nut in Sri Lanka
    http://www.borneoexotics.com

  8. #24

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    Hi,

    many thanks for your kind comments!

    @ schloaty: The pitcher coloured up prior to opening and didn't change its colour at all after it had opened. The previous one had the same colour as yours, so I believe it is just a matter of age and of course appropriate light levels to get good coloured pitchers.

    @ Dustin: The N. villosa isn't too impressive at a diameter of 12 cm and pitchers being 2.5 cm in height. Tony's 'big' N. villosa for sure is more impressive than mine!

    Cheers Joachim

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