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Thread: Careful with Ebay!

  1. #9

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    You are correct Cchang, but I did not have the time, money or knowledge as to obtain a phytosanitary certificate and the other source said it wasn't necessary.

    I do want to applaud those who strive to grow these plants in countries where they are not readily available. ESPECIALLY if their entire collection was obtained legally. You seem to understand this, Cchang, which makes you one of the "good guys".

    I don't think anyone wants or likes to be fined by [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/unclesam.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/rock.gif[/img]

    SF

  2. #10

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    Dear All:

    I agree with you all 300%. It is wise to get the necessary paperwork to be able to import from any country. However, there are some countries which go overboard with quarantine import restrictions. To the extent that no nursery is motivated to export to such country. This is the case in Australia. Hey, we are law abiding citizens? why do we have to be punished this way?. In australia a phytosanitary certificate is not enough!!. the plants still have to remain in quarantine for 60 days!!. Quarantine comes from latin preffix "quar" which means 40. So quarantine should be a confinement of a live specimen for 40 days in an isolated area to avoid spread of a particular disease. But here in Oz, it is confinement of a live specimen for 60 days so it should be called "sesquintine".

    Anyway, I want to legally import some plants from a major nursery overseas and I am complaining to the minister of agriculture in my country at the same time to make him see that the laws are to strict when it comes to importing exotic plants. If things go this way, soon, nobody would be able to import anything live at all!!.

    I want to protect the environment as much as you all do, but please, let's not overdo it!!.


    Gus

  3. #11

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    I guess the only question is do you feel lucky? It is to bad that a few bad seeds had to wreck it for tons of ppl. It make good ppl look like criminals but it is a serious matter and the goverment does not know your backround. Is it worth sending a seed of a cp to someone in another country for a fine up to 2500 dollars, no. I would personally feel horrible if I did that and the person I sent it too got cought. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/sad.gif[/img]

    Griffin, that is horrible what happened. It is a lesson to everyone else I guess...just wish it would of never happened.

    Travis
    \"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go.\"
    -- Oscar Wilde

    http://www.nasarracenia.org/

  4. #12
    swords's Avatar
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    It's the extent of the smuggling activities by the "few bad seeds" that caused such strict laws. Whole species localities had been wiped out by overcollecting for the nursery trade in the years before CITES came into effect (in the 1970s I think). So now the same laws that govern the illegal importing of zebra skins, cassowary feathers or bones, giant tortise shells, elephant ivory, tiger skin rugs, or even live birds of paradise or tigers. also includes the Orchids, Nepenthes and other endangered plant species (S. oreophilla).

    There are some screwy aspects to CITES, including the fact that even pressed dried botanical specimens can not pass through international borders. People have been fined for receiving pressed orchid specimens some 100 years old because that particular species was listed on CITES and the botanical type specimen had no CITES paperwork even though the plant was obviously collected before the CITES treaty was enacted.

    Gus,
    Malesiana Tropicals supplies very small ex-vitro plantlets especially for places like Australia and NZ. A dime sized plantlet isn't the ideal "new plant" but according to MT these will get through better than normal plants. Perhaps you should email them to see what they can tell you about buying and exporting plants for Australia.

    How about buying from Exotica or Southern carnivores? They have very nice collections and are already in Australia.

  5. #13

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    I want to import too!!, but at least 2,000 dollars worth of merchandise!!. What is the best place to do so??

    cp addict

  6. #14

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    About importing seeds, it is not legal by the CITES? We must have a permit? I don't know if the laws you are talking about are only for the USA version of the CITES, but here is the CITES page for Canada:

    For example, for Nepenthes rallfesiana seeds (listed as Nepenthes spp, since it is not N. rajah or N. khasiana):

    http://www.cites.ec.gc.ca/ControlLis...ang=e&code=954

    It is saying that the seeds, TC plants and such are excluded from CITES (for Appendix 2), so you do not need permit to import them. I am writing a letter right now to them for being sure of his affirmation, though. I'll let you know!

  7. #15

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    Tom,

    Actually, I think we might have drifted from trading seeds to Singapore (the original topic) to trading in general.

    You are correct that TC's and seeds do not need phytosanitary certificates to import/export to/from Canada. I've confirmed this with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. But if it's a CITES protect species, it's always best to check. Earlier this year, I exported Nepenthes Ventricosa and they completed 2 forms for me. One was the standard Phytosanitary certificate, the other, more for precautionary measures, was a CITES declaration since Nepenthes was listed. There was no extra cost for the CITES documentation so I didn't mind. Sooooo, although you may not require a phytosanitary cert. to import/export the seeds to/from Canada, you may require a CITES cert.
    DOH!

  8. #16
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Every country has their own laws with regard to Import/export permits and Phytosanitary certificate requirements. These are seperate from international CITES requirments.

    Requirements might be slightly different as well if your importing vs exporting.

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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