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Thread: neps outside

  1. #9

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    Carcinos,
    Had to respond. I live in So. Cal and grow all of my highlanders and a quite a few lowlanders outside year round. I have yet to kill any Neps because of the weather. As soon as I buy them outdoors they go. Some get full sun while others get some shade cloth. Depends on the sunny weather. Now that it's fall, they get pretty much full sun. I fully suggest growing them outdoors. You get fantastic pitchers and good strong healthy cuttings when the plants grow out. You can find more info at Nepenthes around the house

  2. #10

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    I noticed better results when our weather got amazingly humid for about three months. (60-100, mostly the higher end) I think the light was just right then also. It might be getting too low now. Time to go move the plants, after this post.

    Our humidity lows are down into the high 50s now, I don't like it. Although today the humidity is around 75% and it's in the eighties. I can feel the Fall in the air, not.

    I've got several new plants out of shipping that are not growing new pitchers and the leaves can't decide what light they like, IMO. Too much, not enough, too much, not enough. Like I said, time to go do some figuring out what's going on out there.

  3. #11

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    We recently started growing N. rajah outdoors in an abandoned potato field at 5,000' altitude. Just planted them out in rows in the ground with some shadecloth over the top of them until they settle in. I haven't seen them for weeks but people who have just been there say they are looking great. Will take a photo and post when I'm up there next week.

    Other species we have planted out along a bank which get full sun for 50% of the day have simply gone berserk. Flowers all over the place and big, big pitchers. I guess the natural food they catch help, there's lot of grasshoppers around. The experiment is only about 2 months old but it's amazing that the plants didn't even slow down whilst they were settling in.
    Rob Cantley
    Nep Nut in Sri Lanka
    http://www.borneoexotics.com

  4. #12

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    Rob,

    Could you give us some of the disadvantages to living in Sri Lanka? Throw us a bone here, man! I feel bad enough with my struggles to grow some of these plants, but when you live in an area where you can plant them in the ground and they go nuts, lol.
    Speaking of which, why do you suppose there is only one native species when the habitat seems so ideal. Or would the question be why diversification did not happen so much there?

    Regards,

    Joe

  5. #13

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    Hi Rob:

    I am not surprised to know that some neps get light only 50% of the time and they go bersek, i grow mine the same way, because i have not much of a choice for the time being but they are doing pretty well.

    Of course, Sydney's weather also helps the highlands more than the lowlands!!.

    Gus

  6. #14

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    Sorry Joe, I wasn't trying to make anyone jealous, there are lots of disadvantages to living in Sri Lanka, believe me!

    It is far from ideal Nepenthes country here because most of the island suffers severe climatic swings, with months of total drought being common. Nepenthes don't like drought at all and there are only a few very small areas which remain wet all year round, hence the lack of diversification. We can grow Neps outdoors here because we water them, otherwise they would surely die in the dry season. What we do have however, is ideal temperatures and light levels.

    Most Nepenthes naturally grow on one side of a hill, or on the edge of a forest clearing, or even on one side of a shady bush so that they get full sun for half of the day and shade for the rest. We've got bushes of N. mirabilis growing outside the west side of a greenhouse here so that they get only afternoon sun from about 1 PM onwards. They are in perfect health, flower continuously and have no burning on the leaves. The same plants won't grow properly only a few feet away where they get sun all day. They just burn badly.
    Rob Cantley
    Nep Nut in Sri Lanka
    http://www.borneoexotics.com

  7. #15

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    Rob,

    I was, of course, for the most part joking, but that was a great response. Does N. distillatoria grow in those wetter areas, or does it "tough it" out?
    I almost got in a wreck this morning because I hit a patch of frost on a decline, so there is one clue why Nepenthes are not year-round patio plants(not to mention the hot Summers and the almost constant wind).

    Regards,

    Joe

  8. #16

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    South Florida is one of the few places in the USA where Nepenthes can be grown outside practically year round. We have seen plants (mostly hybrids) grown in conditions we would never subject them to! Our two problems here are overly warm night temperature in summer, and severe cold fronts (temps down to freezing)in winter. The cold fronts are an easy problem to solve-just bring the plants in for a day or two until the weather warms up again.
    Nepenthes are become popular down here with the general public, ie. 'plant people' who have green thumbs and like to grow orchids, staghorn ferns, bromeliads, aroids on the screened in backyard deck. We hear all kinds of stories from these enthusiasts about how they grow their Nepenthes, and it is amazing how adaptive they are.

    Trent

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