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Thread: How To Kill Pests

  1. #1

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    Wink

    Hi All,

    Some kind of catepillar is munching on the edges of my Nep leaves and pitchers. They are about an inch or two, thin, covered with lots of fine white 1/2 inch "fur". Also, something is eating holes inside the leaves of new shoots and causing them to sort of grow deformed. I was wondering what insecticide is best and if I have to use one that requires a hose and bottle to spray or can I just mix it in a spray bottle and spritz it on manually. I'd be afraid of using my hard alkaline hose water on my Neps. The infestation isn't bad but its making for a few ugly leaves on nice big plants. Thanks.

    Bobby [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]

  2. #2
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    if they are visable, just pluck them off and crush them, or throw them in the pitchers.

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    Hi nepenthes gracilis,

    The catepillars are visable but the guys eating some holes in the center of new shoots and causing deformity seem to be something else. The catepillars are also eating immature pitchers. I am thinking of spraying before I bring them in for the winter that's why I wanted to see what to use that is ok for just a spray bottle and not a hose attachment. The plants are in hanging baskets and are big -- maybe 20+ pitchers each. They're just commercial lowland hybrids so they seem tough.

    Bobby

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    this is just an idea, but why not pour some pitcher fluid in the affected area (growing point)? the nature of the fluid will probably break the surface tension for the bugs and they may drown. the liquid may also stick depending on the species, preventing the pests from returning. i don't think it will harm the plant ether, as i believe the enzymes in the fluid don't digest plant matter. Zongyi
    What you want to do is illeagle here in Canada.
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    Capslock's Avatar
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    Bobby,

    I use Orthene out of a spray bottle, and it seems to work fine. Just dilute it the right amount. I keep a pre-mixed bottle handy, and haven't found my neps to even notice, though the bugs do!

    Capslock
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  6. #6

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    Biggun,
    I've had similar problems but not with caterpillars. More with slugs that come out at nighttime. I grow my guys outdoors. Check for small slugs under the moss. Also look for small gelatinous spheres. Those would be the eggs. If nothing else, you have some kind of worm, caterpillar, etc. that comes out and munches your plant. Usually you can inspect the plant and potting media for the culprit. Also check around the area your Nep is in. Sometimes snails, slugs, and the like hide under catch saucers, tables, or wherever they can remain undetected. I use Ortho systemic insect killer for all chewing and sucking insects. Usually that's limited to aphids and mealybug. I've never had any problems with that insecticide. I measure out a gallon of water to 3 tablespoons, I believe, of chemical at a time. I put the smaller mix in a spray bottle that has a stream and spray setting. Like those old 409 bottles, or leftover window cleaner bottles. Rinsed out of course! Use chemicals as a last resort. Chewing insects are usually visible and easily removed. Especially if they are under the soil.

    Good luck,
    Joel

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