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Thread: variegated macrophylla?

  1. #1

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    Hey Folks,

    Got a N. macrophylla that is exhibiting some leaf variegation. Is this normal or a complete rarity. I wouldn't mind having a variegated N. macrophylla that's for sure! Feedback?

    Check it out here until I figure out how to post an image here.Variegated Macrophylla

  2. #2
    swords's Avatar
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    Interesting. If it is not some sort of nutrient deficiency causing abnormal leaf striations then I'd say you've got something special there cos mine isn't variegated!
    Did the plant just begin making this or did each leaf have a bit of silvery/white on each leaf when it arrived? Is the plant exposed to any strong chemicals or smells? I wouldn't imagine so, but some chemicals can do some strange things to plants-such as swap thier genes and start creating differently shaped leaves and cause thier chromosome counts to change.
    Keep us up to date on this!

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    Dear Joel:

    I don't want to spoil the party, but since you mentioned it, see if the following quote from mike catalani's nepenthes university section on macrophylla applies to your query.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]It is reported that some of the plants in cultivation may be a hybrid (N. x Tusmadiensis (N. macrophylla x N. lowii)) since there have been reports of hairs on the underside of the lids. This is possible if seed was collected, since N. x trusmadiensis is a naturally occurring hybrid. It was once reported that N. x trusmadiensis was somewhat abundant on Mt. Trusmadi, but later reports stated that it is very rare, and that all plants may be connected to the main mother plant. It could be that seed was collected from a macrophylla plant, in which some of the flowers of the racemae was fertilized with pollen from N. lowii. Whereas my plant was fairly fast growing, plants which are in question of being a hybrid are reported to grow rather slowly (a trait of lowii.) I have noticed that the pitchers of one of the plants in question matches closely that of N. trusmadiensis, and is much more red in coloration than my macrophylla plant, which had yellow orange pitchers and no hairs under the lid.
    are all macrophyllas hairy?. yours is definitely hairy!!


    Gus

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    swords's Avatar
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    The article is speaking about the stalagmite type hairs of N. lowii under the lid, not on the outside of the lid or leaf margins which is common for N. macrophylla (even the pitchers are somewhat velvety to the touch with very short hairs). The "stalagmite" hairs of N. lowii & N. Trusmadiensis are not visible (or developed) until the pitchers are at least 5+ cm in height and the pitchers becoming subadult.

    His N. macrophylla looks similar to mine when I first recieved it last December. My N. Trusmadiensis x veitchii (I know, not exactly a N. Trusamdiensis but the closest I've gotten thus far) is indeed a far slower plant. I have owned it much longer than the N. macrophylla and it is just now reaching the same size and very slowly developing pitchers, showing no intention of forming sub adult pitchers yet at this stage, still only juvenile pitchers.
    N. macrophylla begins creating sub adult pitchers very soon after the stage his plant is at now. Mine is 8 cm and the 3 cm pitchers clearly show the ribbed peristome stout yellow/orange pitchers tinted red with a wide mouth and broad lid. the leaves are slightly less hairy as it gets larger.

  5. #5
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    Mine deffinately doesnt look like that [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/ghostface.gif[/img] . It's just a regular one. Hmm, mine is about 6cm in diameter, and 3/4 inch pitchers. I've noticed that it's a nice steady grower so for. Hopefuly yesturdays milk feeding will help it along [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img] . N.A.T.H., I'd say that you now have the ultimate nepenthes [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]. A species with large variegated leaves, and huge orange pitchers, with a highly toothed peristome! Your so lucky, hehe.

  6. #6

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    Wow, i've never seen variegated nepenthes. Interesting leaf. From the photo it looks like it's just that one leaf. Have you seen the variegation elsewhere in the plant?
    There's no 'a' in perlite.

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    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    I sent Joel some info via email but wanted to do a reply here also.

    This is a classic example of a chimera mutation. They are usually fairly unstable and the plant often outgrows it. If you look closely at the picture the smaller leaf on the left side has some discoloration but not nearly as white as the larger leaf.

    Basically what has happened is some of the cells within the meristematic tissue have mutated and can no longer produce chlorophyll. The meristem is now comprised of a mixture of normal and mutated cells. As the plant grows and the cells within the meristem divide and grow to form various plant parts, the mutated cells may or may not show up. It depends on the proportion between the two types of cells and the location within the meristem. Picture it like an orange.. and consider just one section to contain mutated cells while all the others are normal. The only time the mutation (in this case variegation) shows up is when the cells from that single affected section are used to form part of a leaf (or other plant part).

    I have seen this before in various Nepenthes. Sometimes it is a variegation. Sometimes it is a malformed leaf etc. Usually they pop up in stock from tissue cultured plants because of the increased likelyhood for mutation when dealing with callus proliferation.

    Tony



    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  8. #8

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    If variegation takes place in only a part of the plant, it would be very interesting, if possible, to make a cutting out of this plant and let it grow on its own, then you'll have a 100% mutant macrophylla. Yeah!!. That's what i want to see some day.

    Gus

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