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Thread: why wont it grow?

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    My nepenthes bicalcarata that I recieved via mail has not grown much at all since I got it on Oct. 30th. Its only major growth was a small leaf that it came with grew a little, but nothing else has happened. it is on a windowsill in a plastic jar like container. Any suggestions?

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    Capslock's Avatar
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    It's only been a couple of weeks. Usually, neps received via mail have a little shock period for a while. The advice I was given was to not expect it to do much for a couple of months. You're still in the early stage there. I wouldn't worry about it for a while, just make sure you give it the best conditions you can.

    Capslock
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    It is new and has not acclimated yet, but unless your window jar is 85-95*F all day everyday and 70-75*F at night I wouldn't be holding my breath for any fast growth. N. bical is a lowland plant that requires high heat, high light and high humidity to grow fast and create the large pitchers and plant the size of a dining room table.
    I would suggest figuring out a better growing situation if you want it to grow well. Once the plant is larger 3+ feet in diameter then it can take SLIGHTLY cooler temps and still do OK with days between 75-85*F and nights of 65-75*F but it will certainly not grow fast in these conditions and may not pitcher.

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    I think I have the heat problem figured out, I could move one of those lamps with the small flourescent screw-in lamps (with the coiled tube) that would provide some more light and heat. The temps in my house are about 70 degrees usually, but being in a jar raises the temp. And with the added heat from the lamp, the jar may just be up to the right temp.

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    This may not be the very best place to post this, but does anyone think that soft flourescent light is good for neps? The only flour. lamps I have for plants are those and it would be nice to keep the bical and this other gublers nep under some of these on my desk. In that lighting article in the greenhouse forum I thought it said soft light in unhelping for plants. However, my terrarium uses those and everything seems pretty healthy. (I dont know for sure if these are soft light, but there is a good chance they may be). any ideas on soft light? Thanx for the help [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

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    swords's Avatar
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    Hmm, you mean "soft white"? This term is usually applied to incandescents, whereas "warm white" is usually applied to fluorescents. A balance of soft white (or warm white) and cool white is generally the combination used when using fluorescents. Such as 2 SW and 2 CW is rather effective while the plants are young. The more light you can supply your plants the better off they will be because wish as we might, fluorescent light can not compare to sunlight.

    Quality or color temperature of lighting is important. However, quantity/intensity of light is of more importance to photosynthesis and vegetative growth over color temp of light. That is, so long as the light is not too yellow (2400-4000 Kelvins) or too blue (10,000+ Kelvins). These color temperature bulbs reduce the available lighting intensity. Generally you should look for tubes that range between 4800-6500 Kelvins). These values are usually standard in cool white and warm white fluorescent tubes.

    For an example of lighting intensity importance:
    My intermediate chamber, is lit by a 400 watt metal halide. The plants in the middle 3/4 of the chamber do very well and become enormous very quickly. The 3 plants on either of the farthest ends do not pitcher as nicely nor grow as quickly (they pitcher easily but the pitchers are not as large as they should be) and this is simply due to the only slightly diminished light intensity.

    I hope that helps some! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

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    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    According to my chart the following applies to fluorescent lightbulbs (some of these are specialty bulbs and not something you would find in a home improvement store):
    soft white - 2700K
    warm white - 3000K
    neutral white - 3500K
    cool white - 4100K
    lite white - 4200K
    chroma50 - 5000K
    daylight - 6500K
    chroma75 - 7500K
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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    N. bical takes awhile to settle in. I have a small N. bical that has not grown for over two months as it came in what looked like good shape, but the roots had dried out in shipment and it lost all but two leaves. It has not produced any new leaves and has just been in suspended animation ever since.

    The compact fluorescent bulbs I have seen come in Warm White, Soft White, and Daylight.
    Nick

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