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Thread: N. burbidgeae

  1. #1

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    I've had a young N. burbidgeae for a while now but it just doesn't seem to grow. What are the light, soil, heat requirements for this species?

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    swords's Avatar
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    Nepenthes burbidgeae is a highland species growing from 1200-2250 meters above sea level, this means it appreciates considerable nighttime cooling. My plant experiences a semi-controlled environment with a daytime high of 70-80*F and a nighttime low of 50-55*F for most of the year, occasionally dipping to 45*F at night during winter. It also needs to have high humidity (85%+), good air movement and bright lighting (mine grows under 300 watts of power compact fluorescent lighting).

    As far as soil, mine is only 10 cm in diameter right now and I have it simply planted in Long Fibered Sphagnum moss. When I decide to replant it to it's "adult" pot (either a wooden slat basket or plastic net pot) I will also give it a more open and free draining mix of LFS, orchid bark and charcoal.

  3. #3
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    My N. burbidgeae is a big 25cm across plant. It is planted in sphagnum moss, recieves trace element fertilizer, is fed naturally and recieves natural sunlight. Humidity is at least 60% in the day and near saturation level at night. Temperature is up to 85F in the day and 50F at night.

    Here's a photo of the plant.

    [img]http://home.**********.com/nepenthesgracilis/burb2.JPG[/img]

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    I've been growing this species for over seven years, and have raised specimens from very small seedlings to mature plants. Overall, it is an easy species to cultivate. It will tolerate intermediate conditions quite well, so I would aim for temperatures in the 15 to 30 C range, with attendant high humidity. I would also begin feeding it with insects immediately, if you have not already done so.

    It would also help us to diagnose your problem better if you could provide a detailed description of your cultivation conditions, as well as an assessment of the rate of growth of your plant. Also, have you successfully cultivated any other species of this genus?

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    Sorry to bring this up again, but my plant continues to be a gorgeous salmon-red color, in spite of having new leaves and another pitcher on the way. I've spoken to someone else who got theirs at the same time as i did, and he says his plant is red, as well. Does anyone know if the recently released burbidgeae from one of the nurseries is an accidental hybrid or a red form? Neps, have your plants all been as green as Nep G's?
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    swords's Avatar
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    D.,
    As before, I wouldn't be concerned unless there is actual burning damage happening on the plant. I've grown my N. rajah in the same conditions for about 18 months and it still has a red pigmentation on the upper leaf surface and red pigment on the top of the petioles.

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    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Nate, my N. burbidgeae only gets red when a newer leaf opens. Kinda like N. merrilliana, it's red at first then goes to more of a greenish tint. Right now it's getting whatever sun we get a full blast, the shade cloth is off for the season. However N. glabrata has exhibited much more noticable and positive reaction to the higher light levels, if you would like a photo of it just let me know.

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    O:-) trashcan's Avatar
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    My N.spectabilis has turned completely red (not pink, not orange, but a burnt red).. There is new growth that is also red, but everything feels healthy to the touch, and none of the leaves are rotting... So the plant is OK, just reacting to the increased light levels.

    Edit: Upon further review... Maybe a "flush red" would be a better description than "burnt red."




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