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Thread: Light for Neps, drop dead temps?

  1. #9
    swords's Avatar
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    A while ago someone on this board told me that plants did not experience wind chill.

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    Long exposure to low humidity results in shriveled, unformed pitcher lids. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/sad.gif[/img]
    A flytrap ate my homework!
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  3. #11

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    For the curious, here's what remains of poor Clyde's greenhouses after Andrew:

    What Hurricane Andrew left

    What Hurricane Andrew left 2

    Other photos from this remarkable grower's place are here.

    I would have to agree that a plant will experience wind chill, especially when the stomates are open.
    There's no 'a' in perlite.

    My Growlist
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    Anyone who grows tropical plants in Florida has seen wind chill damage. I saw a bench of orchids that got blasted by a cold front years ago down in Homestead, Florida. From the south side, the plants looked fine. As you walked around the bench and viewed from the north they were brown and scorched. The plants had gone unprotected from a north wind that moved through overnight.
    Nice shots of Clyde's place, by the way.
    Trent

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    My theory is that the wind is dessicating, not actually "chilling", because I was always taught that to experiance wind chill, the animal had to perspire... I know that plants transpirate, but I think that may be different... I could be totally off basis, but I am just hypothisizing(sp?). Since plants to not actually sweat to cool off, I think that the wind just dessicates them, because it removes the moisture from their leaves, hence the "blow-torched" look... Sorry if I have a lot of mis-spellings right now, the room is FREEZING and my fingers are numb... Ciao!
    Lithopsman
    I am back..

  6. #14

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    Hi Lithopsman,
    I think your theory is probably right-wind chill for humans would be a different factor than for plants. All I want to do is warn Florida based Nep growers, who most likely grow their plants outside, to protect them from the wind even if the temperature is not that cold.

    Trent

  7. #15
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    Any time there is evaporation, there is cooling, so windchill effects happen to plants too. Wind on nepenthes then would not only dry them out, there would be cooling as well.

    Capslock
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  8. #16
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Hence the phenominon windburn.

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