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Thread: ultra-highlanders

  1. #1

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    Hello,
    I'm going to be making a ultra-highland tank, but was wondering what neps rather than rajah and villosa, also do really good. It will be a true ultra-highland too. Thanks,
    Kevin
    Kevin Peterson
    Grosse Pointe, MI

  2. #2
    brisco225's Avatar
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    Kevin, a few plants that I have researched that would fit the bill are:

    N. muluensis
    N. spathulata
    N. macfarlanei

    What temperatures are you looking at in your Ultra tank? Right now, I keep all my highlanders, including those three, in one structure. Since it is the garage, it gets to about 50 degrees F. at night and in the 70's F. during the daytime.

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    Hi all:

    I don't know about those three. Muluensis definitely needs cooling to perform better, but it does not have to be 50F. I think low 60's would do. Spathulata can grow in intermediate conditions for extended periods of time. McFarlanei, I don't know much about.

    Nepenthes lamii is another candidate that can go along with N. villosa in an ultrahighland tank.that's a real challenge to grow.

    Gus

    Gus

  4. #4
    swords's Avatar
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    A little clarification, TRUE ultra highlanders (those species occuring above 2600 m) should be given temps cooler than necessary for plants like: N. rajah, spathualata, muluensis and macfarlanei. 50's (10-12*C) is good for these guys, mine get colder nowadays (40's/5-8*C) and do just fine.

    For plants like N. villosa, N. lamii and others occuring at the highest altitudes, these need the nighttime temps to reliably drop down into the 40's (5-8*C) at night and no higher during the day than the mid 70's (20-23*C) prefferably 60-70*F (15-20*C) for continued health and well being as they grow. This is why they are called "difficult", it's not the plant, it's suppling the frigid nighttime conditions year round for the plant which is difficult. Extra stong airflow and a light misting after lights out will help bring the temps down a few more notches through evaporation but the daytime must be cooler as well.

    How were you planning to do your cooling setup?

  5. #5
    goldtrap2690's Avatar
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    i hear n. lowii is also an ultra-highlander [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/rock.gif[/img]

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    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Ultra highland can mean different things to different people. Better to define just what your goal is for day/night temps. Then decide how your planning to achieve it and how consistently you will achieve your goal.
    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  7. #7
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Typically I group all highlanders in ultrahighland conditions in my greenhouse because each plant (yes even a few lowlanders) are subjected to cold nights (44-50F) natural cooling and warm to hot days 75-85F. It all depends on the plant you have. If you have N. lamii N. villosa and N. macrophylla you better have a reliable good cooling method if you want to even think of seeing these plants move in growth. But the more typical highland plants can be grown with good success with 60 nights and 75-80 days. Plants like N. burbidgeae, N. veitchii, N. carunculata, N. khasiana, etc. So basically in my opinion, try to provide as cold as you can get it for highlanders at night. and stay under 90F in the day time. Stay above 40F at night though.

    My .02 cents.

  8. #8

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    Hello,
    What I was trying to accomplish was a tank for N. villosa, N. rajah, N. spathulata, and the others I was trying to find out about. It's going to be a large tank, like 100 galloms maybe. I live up in Washington state, and where I live, at the bottom of the Cascade Mountains, its cold all the time here. So out in a "shop area" we have, I would put the tank. In the day it would be like 70*F - 75*F in a tank, at night, around the low fifties, high forties. Cooling during the summer would be achieved from ice, a/c etc. Thanks,
    Kevin
    Kevin Peterson
    Grosse Pointe, MI

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