User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 17 to 22 of 22

Thread: who has the biggest

  1. #17

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,163
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have her in a greenhouse.
    All you growers up north have cool nights to grow highlanders, but our warm humid summers here in south Florida is perfect for species like bicalcarata, ampullaria, rafflesiana, even merriliana and sumatrana. Maxima and khasiana are the only highlanders that tolerate our warm summer nights. Veitchii and fusca struggle. Right now our highland plants are starting to look good because of the cool nights, yet species like bical and amp remain unaffected.

    Trent

  2. #18
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Alexandria Bay, NY Z-5a
    Posts
    6,341
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here' a full pic of it: Beautiful it is not, but serve my purposes it does! All it is consisting of are 2 4 ft shop light fixtures with alternating tubes (4 total) of warm and cool whites. The warms were 3300 lumens and the cool whites must be close to that so I'm guessing a total of about 13,200 lumens is being given to the plants at a distance of about 1 foot to 1 foot and a half. (30 to 45 cm away). They are connected to a timer for summer hours, so my house is lit up after daylight hours quite well! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] The chamber consists of simple plastic garbage bags heavily sealed with tape together over a metal vinyl coated frame. I have numerous white cardboard reflectors on the chamber to minimize light loss. The heat is supplied by the radiator in the back and keeps the chamber very toasty at about 80F in the day down to 70 or even 65F at night depends upon how much the furnace runs.

    [img]http://home.**********.com/nepenthesgracilis/chamber.JPG[/img]




  3. #19

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    110
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (nepenthes gracilis @ Dec. 03 2003,9:40)]Here' a full pic of it: Beautiful it is not, but serve my purposes it does!
    You sound like Yoda! LOL
    anyway, thanks for the pic, looks like it works great. I guess I will have to build somthing very soon.

  4. #20

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    SoCal (born in utah)
    Posts
    1,140
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here's a link to the pic of the bical Schloaty described EDIT: never mind the pic wont show anymore

  5. #21

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    142
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm sure I read somewhere that N. bical hates to have their roots disturbed which is why repotting is such a 'dangerous' time. Has anyone had any good experiences repotting N. bical?
    A 'pitcher gallery' is where the art is drawn by Mother Nature and a 'pitcher says a thousand words'.
    My pitcher gallery is at: http://community.webshots.com/user/neilsingapore

  6. #22
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Alexandria Bay, NY Z-5a
    Posts
    6,341
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Generally as long as you don not shake the root mass or squeeze it or anything dramatic like that, shock will be quite minimal. The death of Josh's plant was probably combined factors, due to the fact it was just repotted and moved outside without being ready to face the world of weather. If a plant is in a terrarium and it need to be repotted, take it out and repot it but I like to (if you have one to use) an ultrasonic humidifier and have the mist pouring over the plant, or just have a mist bottle nearby and mist in the air occasionally. Of course greenhouse plants are a different matter, repotting them is a breeze, only thing you have to wory about there is root disturbence, they are already adapted to the ghouse atmosphere and will take minimal shock if they are repotted responsibly. Moral of this: repot your plants in the environment in which they are grown in. I know it's difficult to do when your plants are in a terrarium but it can eb done with relative ease.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •